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Image / Self

Want to give your skin a boost while inside? 5 reasons turmeric will help


By Jennifer McShane
30th Aug 2020
Want to give your skin a boost while inside? 5 reasons turmeric will help

Turmeric is a spice traditionally used in Indian and Asian cooking. It adds depth of flavour and vibrant yellow-orange colour to curry dishes and, as is popular now, lattes and coffee-based drinks. As well as enhancing the taste of food, it has a multitude of health benefits, having been used in Ayurvedic medicine for around 4,000 years. And modern research has shown that it’s particularly useful when it comes to improving your skin


Food author and writer Domini Kemp is an avid fan of the spice and told IMAGE a little more about its range of health benefits.

“We use fresh turmeric in the Alchemy Anti-Everything juice which also contains black pepper and cold-pressed flax oil. Turmeric is one of the most anti-inflammatory foods and is made more effective when served with black pepper and oil to help aid absorption. It also has powerful antioxidant effects and neutralises free radicals on its own. It’s a fabulous spice and really punches above its weight, nutritionally speaking,” she said.

We’ve listed five reasons your skin will thank you for adding some turmeric into your diet:

It’s an antioxidant (and aids anti-ageing)

Studies suggest that natural constituents of turmeric — especially curcumin — may possess particularly strong antioxidant activity, and may directly reduce skin ageing — including preventing moisture loss and protecting against wrinkles. It helps stimulate new cell growth and helps keep the skin’s elasticity intact.

It’s anti-inflammatory

Inflammation is a big factor in many skin problems, from psoriasis, eczema and other skin rashes. Turmeric can aid the reduction of redness and swelling as one of its most well-known properties is its anti-inflammatory activity, as proved in a myriad of studies.

It aids acne treatment

It has antiseptic properties that can work against acne-causing germs and bacteria. The powerful anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric will heal acne inflammation, thereby making acne appear less visible. Curcumin found in turmeric fades blemishes by speeding up the healing process of wounds, including popped pimple wounds and scars.

It boosts collagen levels

Turmeric is also rich in vitamin C, which promotes collagen deposition (which keeps our skin firm and supple), encouraging the speed at which scars fade away.

It enhances circulation

Curcuminoids in turmeric have been shown to have anti-platelet activity, which means this improves our circulation/blood flow.

Main photograph: Unsplash


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