The world’s most sustainable travel spots revealed
The world’s most sustainable travel spots revealed

Amanda Cassidy

Indoor Halloween activities for kids to get you through the mid-term
Indoor Halloween activities for kids to get you through the mid-term

Lauren Heskin

Planning a festive trip to London this year? These hotels really know how to do Christmas
Planning a festive trip to London this year? These hotels really know how to do...

Sarah Finnan

16 great prints and posters to add some life to your walls
16 great prints and posters to add some life to your walls

Megan Burns

‘Mummy has cancer’: How to talk to children about a parent’s diagnosis
‘Mummy has cancer’: How to talk to children about a parent’s diagnosis

Amanda Cassidy

15 dogs who are costume-ready for Halloween
15 dogs who are costume-ready for Halloween

Grace McGettigan

Bringing unsexy back: putting the freaky back into Halloween
Bringing unsexy back: putting the freaky back into Halloween

Jessie Collins

15 Halloween make-up looks from Instagram’s top MUAs
15 Halloween make-up looks from Instagram’s top MUAs

Grace McGettigan

The importance and benefits of alone time
The importance and benefits of alone time

Niamh Ennis

The best street style from Paris Fashion Week
The best street style from Paris Fashion Week

Holly O'Neill

Image / Beauty
Sponsored

‘Beauty means feeling comfortable in your skin and embracing your imperfections’

Sponsored By

by Rosie McMeel
26th Jun 2019
Sponsored By
‘Beauty means feeling comfortable in your skin and embracing your imperfections’

Growing up with a facial scar meant Evie Harrison felt that she didn’t tick the box of what society terms ‘conventional beauty’. But over the years she has discovered that true beauty comes not from perfection, but from embracing your imperfections.


How did your scar impact you growing up?

I was only two when I was scraped across the face by a cat. It didn’t impact me much when I was a child, but when I reached secondary school, people used to ask me about it all the time and I became much more self-conscious. Then, when I started to wear make-up, it became more noticeable because the product doesn’t sit into the scar and the white line looked more pronounced.

How has your scar impacted your confidence growing up?

It definitely knocked my confidence a bit growing up, but I learned to accept it. My boyfriend thinks it’s the coolest thing ever. He loves it and that impacted how I feel about it today. Doing this photoshoot has really helped me to think about it in a more positive light too.

Photography by Barry McCall

What does beauty mean to you?

Feeling comfortable in your own skin, embracing imperfections and feeling confident.

Have you embraced it?

It’s not something I can cover up so I had to embrace it. It’s just there. Yes, I’ve accepted it now so unless someone asks me about it I forget it’s there. It never stopped me doing anything, but growing up, posing for pictures I’d always turn to and hide that side of my face. Now, I’m proud to show it off.

When have you felt your most confident or beautiful?

On holidays, when you’re lying on the beach, no make-up and sunning yourself. On the beach, everyone is exposed and vulnerable in a way and that’s when I feel most beautiful.

Do you feel pressure to conform to conventional beauty standards?

Yes, I think with social media today pressure is everywhere you turn. It’s always been there, but I think social media has definitely added to the pressure to conform to conventional beauty standards so I think it’s important to be able to switch off from that. After all, most of it is airbrush and filters, people don’t actually look like that.

Do you think your mother’s approach to beauty has impacted your own?

Yes, I’ve learned tips from my mum to boost my self-confidence. She’s very glamorous and believes in doing little things every day that make you feel good and help give me confidence. It could be spending an extra few minutes in the morning on your skincare regime or on your hair, but whatever it is just taking the time on yourself will make you feel better.


As leading advocates for real beauty with a rich history diversifying the images of women portrayed in commercial media, Dove’s latest campaign is an empowering call to shatter unrealistic beauty standards. IMAGE recruited Irish women as part of Dove’s project #ShowUs which is doing the important work of filling the gaps between how beauty has been depicted for generations. With the goal of true inclusivity in mind, we can finally begin to expand society’s definition of beauty.

Also Read

period poverty
BEAUTY
The initiatives fighting hygiene and period poverty in Ireland

The response to Lidl Ireland’s recent period poverty initiative highlights the severity of hygiene poverty in this country. It’s one...

By Holly O'Neill

grey hair
BEAUTY
Andie MacDowell: Why is my grey hair an issue and George Clooney’s isn’t?

Andie MacDowell debuted a new natural look at the premiere of ‘Annette’ earlier this month, but she thinks it’s time...

By Sarah Finnan

Gucci Flora Gorgeous Gardenia
BEAUTY
Gucci Flora Gorgeous Gardenia is the scent you need to stretch out the summer

As Gucci celebrates its 100 anniversary, Gucci Flora Gorgeous Gardenia fragrance has had a revamp.Now in eau de parfum for...

By Holly O'Neill

London Fashion Week
BEAUTY
The five beauty products to know used backstage at London Fashion Week

Behind every great fashion show beauty look is a team of experts using the latest and greatest in beauty to...

By Holly O'Neill

Fenty Parfum
BEAUTY
Rihanna is about to release Fenty Parfum

Everything we know so far about Rihanna’s first Fenty fragrance.It’s been a big couple of days for scent and celebrity....

By Holly O'Neill

scrub
BEAUTY
18 of the best scalp saviours for shinier, nourished hair

“The length, lustre and health of your hair depend on the scalp,” says Gareth Bromell, the celebrity hairdresser behind H...

By Holly O'Neill

tan drops
BEAUTY
The best tan drops for make-up free, sun-kissed skin

Cheat your way to a year-round summer glow with tan drops. Alright, hands up if you were expecting that after...

By Holly O'Neill