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Sean Bean is wrong, intimacy coordinators are an absolute essential in keeping sex scenes safe
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Supper Club: Little Green Spoon’s halloumi, avocado and lime salad
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IMAGE

My Louth: filmmaker Frank W. Kelly
My Louth: filmmaker Frank W. Kelly

Frank W. Kelly

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Sarah Gill

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AGENDA, SELF

‘Stop looking at our teens with suspicion’ – Lawlessness among teens needs compassion, not admonishment


by Amanda Cassidy
17th May 2021
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"Adolescents have had their lives so narrowed down at a time when, developmentally, they need their peer group" Moira Leydon, Assistant General Secretary of the ASTI

The recent spate of inexcusable violent attacks isn't a fair representation of the majority of teenagers (who arguably have suffered greater losses as a result of the pandemic than other age groups). Amanda Cassidy writes about the dangers of further alienating young people, and why we shouldn't tar them all with the same anti-social behaviour brush

“People my age are drinking cos they’re ‘not in the humour today.’ It’s becoming a more regular behaviour, and I think it’s being overlooked. Cocaine is so casual amongst my age group and amongst my peers. There are two or three of us who don’t use drugs. The language is “we’re dying for a buzz” because they’re not able to go out to a club now. We’re sitting in a field and people are blatantly...

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