Tom Daley knit his gold medal an Olympic cosy and it’s the most wholesome thing you’ll see all day
Tom Daley knit his gold medal an Olympic cosy and it’s the most wholesome thing...

Sarah Finnan

Only four women have ever won Olympic medals for Ireland, but four more joined the list last night
Only four women have ever won Olympic medals for Ireland, but four more joined the...

Lauren Heskin

6 brilliant Netflix picks that you NEED to binge-watch in August
6 brilliant Netflix picks that you NEED to binge-watch in August

Jennifer McShane

The best affordable bridal outfits for your big day
The best affordable bridal outfits for your big day

Sarah Finnan

‘I was still doing it for other people’: Simone Biles put her mental health first – and it should be applauded
‘I was still doing it for other people’: Simone Biles put her mental health first...

Jennifer McShane

Will filter free images be a legacy of the pandemic?
Will filter free images be a legacy of the pandemic?

Rose Mary Roche

Morning of the wedding: 9 dos and don’ts for the bridal party
Morning of the wedding: 9 dos and don’ts for the bridal party

Geraldine Carton

What to eat this week: Goat’s cheese and pickled beetroot melt
What to eat this week: Goat’s cheese and pickled beetroot melt

Meg Walker

The most heartwarming moments from the Olympics so far
The most heartwarming moments from the Olympics so far

Sarah Finnan

11 Irish women with the coolest jobs outside Ireland
11 Irish women with the coolest jobs outside Ireland

Geraldine Carton

Image / Editorial
Sponsored

Opposites attack: deep vs high-pitched voices


by IMAGE
15th Jun 2018

Welcome to Opposites Attack; Image.ie’s brand new debate series. Over the coming weeks, two members of our team will go head-to-head, tackling some of the biggest questions from the office kitchen. Today, we debate whether it’s better to have a deep voice or a high-pitched one.

Geraldine Carton, staff writer says:

I hate hearing recordings of my voice, I know everyone does, but as a woman with a very low voice, I feel more justified in my discomfort. Listening to playbacks of myself talking is something I encounter at an increasing rate now that I work as a journalist and frequently carry out interviews. On the phone I seem to take on an audio impersonation of a reptilian villain in a Disney movie. And that’s when I’ve had a good night’s sleep.  

I remember going to an open mic comedy gig at my college, and as the comedian went around doing a bit of audience interaction, he pointed in my direction and asked me a question. My answer was followed by a silence, and then an eruption of howling laughter as the comedian retorted with a “WOHHHH! WHAT’S WITH THE CREEPY MURDERER’S VOICE COMING OUT FROM THE NICE YOUNG LADY?”

Young ladies with deep voices will understand the struggle. The job interviews beginning with a startled reaction as the interviewer adjusts to our deep baritone voices. The constant corrections that no, neither a cold nor a heavy night out is to blame for the state of our voice. “No,” we must say in as chipper a tone as we can muster, “this is just how I always sound!”.

Grace McGettigan, staff writer says:

I would give a large chunk of my life’s savings to have a deeper voice. I’m high-pitched and soft-spoken; the type of voice you’d expect to hear in a kids’ cartoon. Except, I’m not in a kids’ cartoon. I’m in my late-twenties, trying to establish a life-long career. Yet still, when someone rings the house-phone, I’m asked, “Is your mum or dad home?”

Something about my voice makes people tune out of what I’m saying. I can’t command a room like a woman with a deep voice can. I don’t come across as authoritative or powerful; rather small and meek. People don’t take me seriously, even when I’m being deadly serious. I can’t scold a child, (because I sound like one myself); nor can I get my dog to stop barking when a cat walks by our window. My voice seems to go over everyone’s heads. In group projects, I get cut across and talked-over. I can’t help but think I’d be more in control of situations if my voice were a few pitches deeper.

I get quite a few patronising comments, including, “Aww, you’re so cute”. This used to bother me a lot; especially in school or in work environments where I was desperate to sound professional. I’ve finally accepted there are worse things I could be called. Still though, if you hear of any voice deepening technology I could use, send it my way. I’d be very, very, grateful.

 

Want to get in on the conversation? Join us on Instagram or Twitter now.

Also Read

EDITORIAL
Setting mental health boundaries: ‘I didn’t expect the level of anger it caused’

The entitled backlash when someone tries to set their own boundaries is concerning, writes Amanda Cassidy “One particular friend just...

By Amanda Cassidy

IMAGE WRITES
The sexist commentary at Wimbledon still remains a problem

Wimbledon in 2021 and once again female athletes are singled out on the playing field, a great deal of the...

By Jennifer McShane

Keith-_-Tara_130_Web Shantanu Starick painting kitchen cabinets
EDITORIAL
How to limit drips and brush strokes while painting kitchen cabinets

Painting kitchen cabinets can be transformative and can be achieved relatively low-cost, but you need the right equipment, and a lot of...

By Amanda Kavanagh

EDITORIAL
The Howth train attack represents a lawlessness that makes me fear for my daughters

I fear the true fallout of Covid on our cities is just getting started, writes Amanda Cassidy As the pandemic...

By Amanda Cassidy

EDITORIAL
Chrissy Teigen’s past trolling tweets highlight the slut-shaming culture we tolerated

Chrissy Teigen is the queen of oversharing. Usually it’s in good humour, self-deprecating and irreverent. She doesn’t take herself too...

By Amanda Cassidy

EDITORIAL
“A slap in the face for all the victims”: Outcry over Bill Cosby’s release from prison

This is why rape victims think twice before coming forward, writes Amanda Cassidy He was once known as “America’s Dad”...

By Amanda Cassidy

EDITORIAL
‘Suddenly alive again’: The heartbreaking joy of finding a deceased loved one on Google Maps street view

“I look at my mum’s old house on Google maps street view, the house where I grew up. It says...

By Amanda Cassidy