5 fashion secrets from seriously stylish women
5 fashion secrets from seriously stylish women

Marie Kelly

Mayday! Met Éireann has warned the public to expect frost this week
Mayday! Met Éireann has warned the public to expect frost this week

Sarah Finnan

These Irish cream make-up staples give the most realistic glow
These Irish cream make-up staples give the most realistic glow

Holly O'Neill

Madeleine McCann parents still ‘cling to hope’ ahead of her 18th birthday
Madeleine McCann parents still ‘cling to hope’ ahead of her 18th birthday

Jennifer McShane

‘Skins’ actress Kaya Scodelario’s horrifying audition tale is proof that the casting couch is still a thing
‘Skins’ actress Kaya Scodelario’s horrifying audition tale is proof that the casting couch is still...

Sarah Finnan

‘I need to go on an extreme diet so I can look like the other three’: Jesy Nelson is tired of being pitted against other women
‘I need to go on an extreme diet so I can look like the other...

Jennifer McShane

House Tour: An exclusive peek inside a stylish book-filled Dublin 4 apartment
House Tour: An exclusive peek inside a stylish book-filled Dublin 4 apartment

Nathalie Marquez Courtney

Image / Self

Double check children’s costumes are safe this Halloween


by Jennifer McShane
12th Oct 2020
blank

It’s a night of delightfully creepy fun and games for children of all ages, but the HSE list of advisory tips to ensure safety comes first is as important to remember – even down to choosing those all-important costumes and props for your little ones. 


Halloween costumes and accessories

Check the label

Look for the CE mark when you are buying children’s costumes and costume accessories.

The CE mark means the outfit meets current safety laws.

Check that anything you dress your child in is flame resistant. It should say on the label. Be aware of fire risks. Some costumes can catch fire easily.

Not all Halloween props are safe for kids

If you are buying props for your child’s costume, these may not be classified as toys or meet the safety requirements or standards for toys. Make sure that props for example swords, devil forks and other costume accessories, are made of soft flexible materials. Novelty Halloween lights, similar to Christmas lights, are very popular. All electrical products sold in the EU must meet safety regulations, have a visible CE mark and have full contact details of the manufacturer and importer.

Make sure all costumes, accessories and props fit correctly and avoid over-sized shoes, high heels, long dresses, and long capes and be sure children wear their normal clothes under their costume. This is so they will have some protection if the costume catches fire.

Know what to look out for with Halloween novelty face paint

If you’re buying face paints, buy from a reputable source where the product can be traced to a supplier. Always check the packaging has a clear list of the ingredients and instructions. The CE mark and the manufacturer and importer contact details should be included on the packaging. Check if there are any warnings saying it’s not suitable to use on children. Try using non-toxic face paint, but make sure it has the CE mark. Check the label for any warnings and the list of ingredients.

Make sure your child is visible in the dark

The evenings are dark this time of year so it’s important to make sure your child can be seen when out and about. Remember many costumes are dark so ideally your child should wear a reflective strip on the front and back or a high vis vest and carry a torch. Your child can easily remove their vest when they arrive at each house and slip it back on again before moving onto the next one.

It is a good idea to avoid poorly lit areas and use footpaths where available. If you are driving at Halloween, remember to slow down and watch out for children in dark costumes out and about and treat or treating.

Halloween fire risks

Avoid fireworks or unsupervised bonfires

Fireworks are illegal in Ireland with the exception of licensed displays. Most of the illegal fireworks and bangers on sale in markets and from street traders are manufactured without safety standards and can cause serious injuries to children.

Plan family fun and activities that don’t include fireworks and do not allow children to attend unsupervised bonfires. Be cautious even at supervised bonfires. You never know when someone might throw something into the bonfire that could be highly flammable or toxic. Water or the appropriate fire extinguisher should always be nearby. Children should never hold lit sparklers as they can burn as hot as 700oC.

If your child’s clothes catch fire, get them to:

  • drop to the ground, covering their face with their hands
  • roll on the ground until the fire is out

If they cannot do this, smother the flames with a blanket or towel.

If their skin gets burnt, hold the burnt skin under a cool running tap water for 20 minutes.

Keep the rest of your child’s body warm while you are cooling the burnt area. This is to prevent hypothermia. Get medical help right away. In an emergency phone 999 or 112.

Photographs: Pexels


More like this:

RelatedHow children and adults can avoid asthma attacks during Halloween

Related8 Halloween safety tips for dog owners

Also Read

blank
premium REAL-LIFE STORIES, PARENTHOOD
‘Where’s Granny? She’s up in the sky. Well if I grow a pair of wings, can I fly up to see her?’

Jennie McGinn lost her mother Annie in October 2020. From an unusually large, and unusually female family, she writes about losing the centre of their family orbit and how she has managed parenting a toddler and a small baby while wanting to spend time completely submerged in her grief.

By Jennie McGinn

blank
RELATIONSHIPS
The rise of the narcissist and how to recognise the signs within close relationships

We are in the midst of a narcissism epidemic, according...

By Amanda Cassidy

blank
HEALTH & WELLNESS
Ask the expert: Should I consider freezing my eggs?

A long time ago, Edaein O’Connell (25) made a conscious...

By Edaein OConnell

signs your relationship is over
SELF
5 signs your relationship has run its course, according to experts

Wondering if your relationship has run its course? There are...

By IMAGE

blank
premium REAL-LIFE STORIES, RELATIONSHIPS
Pandemic dating: ‘Sorry I can’t see you anymore, I’m in a bubble with my mum’

Finn McRedmond broke up with her boyfriend two weeks before lockdown 1.0. After a year of pandemic dating, this Valentine's day, she has some thoughts.

By Finn McRedmond

Dominique McMullan and her son, Kai
premium HEALTH & WELLNESS, PARENTHOOD
‘It’s 7 months since my miscarriage. And today I am 18 weeks pregnant’

In this tender piece, Dominique McMullan writes about pregnancy after miscarriage and the difficulty in coming to terms with new life

By Dominique McMullan

blank
HEALTH & WELLNESS
5 simple ways to help reduce your sugar cravings

By Jennifer McShane