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Image / Advice

12 ways to cope through difficult times according to a psychologist


By IMAGE
03rd Feb 2022

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12 ways to cope through difficult times according to a psychologist

Psychologist and author Niamh Fitzpatrick shares her mental health strategies, for when life isn’t what we expected.

NAME IT

It’s vital to name how you feel and to place context on those feelings. So, it might be: “I feel stressed because we’re fighting all the time.” Or “I feel anxious because money is so tight.”

TAKE A BREATH

Breathe in through your nose for a count of four, exhale slowly for a count of eight; do this a few times. It will bring a pause to the panic and allow you to think clearly – a vital tool in difficult times.

FEEL THE FEELINGS

Acknowledge the feelings – don’t try to ignore them, run from them, or mask them. Strong emotional states are normal responses to challenging times, so accept that how you feel is normal and allow yourself to feel what you feel without judgement. As Austrian psychiatrist and Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl once said, “An abnormal reaction to an abnormal situation is normal behaviour.”

DON’T LET YOUR MIND GO DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE

When those really difficult times arrive in life, our minds can run on ahead and we think of all the “what if?” scenarios, wondering how it’s all going to work out. Unless we do this in a conscious way, it’s rarely helpful because we so often catastrophise and assume that the worst-case scenario is the only possible outcome. So, stay in the present and deal only with the facts of what is right in front of you.

WHAT WOULD HELP?

We can sometimes tend to focus on the problem rather than on sourcing a solution. So even if it feels like an impossible situation, ask yourself, “What would help make this even a little better?” This shifts attention towards what’s useful and can often unlock a course of action that can be of great help.

CONTROL THE CONTROLLABLES

Lots of things in life are out of our control, and it’s important to consider the elements of your situation that are within your control, and focus your attention and efforts on them, rather than on factors that are outside of your influence.

CHUNK IT DOWN

It can be quite overwhelming trying to come to terms with challenging times in life, but it’s useful to chunk things down and not try to deal with too much at once. Take things one day at a time, look at the challenge ahead of you in small chunks, and deal with each chunk one at a time.

PRIORITISE SELF-CARE

Rest, sleep, hydration, good nutrition, fresh air, gentle movement, and connection with loved ones are so important. Find something to occupy you, and avoid toxic people and unnecessary tasks.

TAKE A BREAK

Even momentary breaks from the worry of your situation can be beneficial. Think of little things that will give you little breaks, such as wrapping up warm and getting some fresh air, reading a book, soaking in a warm bath, watching a favourite film, having a cup of tea in front of the fire, or chatting to a friend on the phone. These won’t solve your worries, but they can help sustain you as you navigate them.

GATHER SUPPORT

Many of us have people in our lives who want to help when we’re going through bereavement, redundancy, illness, or other big life challenges. The giving and receiving of that support can bring benefit to all parties, so think about who might be offering help that you have not yet accepted and consider whether it might be time to do so.

GET PROFESSIONAL HELP IF NEEDED

For many people, the hard times in life will not require professional help. Sometimes, however, a qualified and experienced ear can be hugely beneficial when it comes to finding your way through times of difficulty. There is no shame in this; indeed, it’s a strength to recognise when it would be useful to look for guidance in navigating the lows in life.

IF YOU CAN’T MAKE IT BETTER, AT LEAST DON’T MAKE IT WORSE

On my last birthday before Dara died, I got annoyed about something and I never saw her that day. I cannot fix that, but I can make it worse by going over and over it in my head and wishing that I had made a different choice that day. As I cannot make it better, my job is to at least not make it worse, so I focus on the days that we did have together, rather than focusing my attention on the one day that I regret but cannot change. Don’t make a difficult situation worse with a focus of attention on things that you cannot change.

Tell Me the Truth About Loss by Niamh Fitzpatrick (Gill Books, €16.99) is out now.  This article originally appeared in the IMAGE 2020/2021 Annual issue.

Photography by Getty.