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Image / Living / Interiors

67% of Irish people made changes to their homes during the first lockdown, according to Ikea study


by Megan Burns
04th Nov 2020
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Ikea’s Life at Home Report 2020 revealed how we spent our time during the first lockdown, with many of us taking comfort from our home environments. 


A huge 67 per cent of Irish people made changes to their home during the first lockdown earlier this year, compared with just 40 per cent globally, a new study by Ikea shows.

It confirms what many of us suspected from anecdotal evidence: the queues snaking around the carpark of Ikea, as well as DIY and home improvement stores were unlike anything we’d seen before.

With people suddenly spending more time than ever at home, it seems as a nation we were keen to make the most of this situation, taking the opportunity to do everything from painting to creating a home office space.

Irish people also seem to have taken more joy in their homes during this time than other nations, with 98 per cent of people saying they mostly stayed in their homes during this time, and 90 per cent stating that home has been their sanctuary during the pandemic, compared to 78 per cent globally – over 38,000 people in 37 countries were interviewed worldwide.

The study also showed that people’s homes were required to perform more functions than before, which was likely a main reason for the number of people making changes to their property.

Of the respondents, 34 per cent of Irish people said a study or a home working space was at the top of their wish list of home improvements, while 32 per cent said they would like a space to pursue their hobbies, and 30 per cent said they would like a bigger kitchen.

“34 per cent of Irish people said a study or a home working space was at the top of their wish list of home improvements”

A huge 60 per cent of Irish people also said their work/life balance improved during lockdown, with 66 per cent saying they would consider moving further away from their office in order to get access to outdoor space. It seems that working from home has allowed many to re-evaluate what is most important to them.

“2020 marks a reboot in our relationship with home,” says Jenny Lee, Life at Home Communication Leader at Ingka Group (IKEA).

“The Life at Home research shows that people are already energetically making necessary changes to their spaces – whether big or small, practical or wellbeing driven – in order to better meet our needs. But this is just the beginning – in the future, we can also expect heavy scrutiny and investment in the way our homes are created. The homes of the future won’t simply be about functionality, they’ll also be designed as a vital tonic for our mental and physical wellbeing.”

Featured image: Ikea


Read more: This Rathgar home with a gorgeous architectural extension is on the market for €950,000

Read more: Create a space they’ll love to play in with these 10 items to brighten up your kids’ room

Read more: These brands will give your Ikea furniture a unique finish

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