The female chess champ suing ‘The Queen’s Gambit’ for being ‘grossly sexist and belittling’
The female chess champ suing ‘The Queen’s Gambit’ for being ‘grossly sexist and belittling’

Sarah Finnan

3 for Tuesday: Facial sprays to keep at your desk (and why you shouldn’t overuse them)
3 for Tuesday: Facial sprays to keep at your desk (and why you shouldn’t overuse...

Aisling Keenan

Chrissy Teigen has shared a post about how her body feels ‘frozen in time’ after her pregnancy loss
Chrissy Teigen has shared a post about how her body feels ‘frozen in time’ after...

Megan Burns

What’s on this September: What to watch, stream, read and listen to this month
What’s on this September: What to watch, stream, read and listen to this month

Lauren Heskin

It’s a beautiful day to tell the truth: Why Katherine Heigl was demonised but Patrick Dempsey was idolised for their ‘Grey’s’ exits
It’s a beautiful day to tell the truth: Why Katherine Heigl was demonised but Patrick...

Sarah Finnan

Emmys 2021: the best red-carpet looks
Emmys 2021: the best red-carpet looks

Holly O'Neill

Hillary Clinton will be in Belfast this week for her inauguration as Queen’s University chancellor
Hillary Clinton will be in Belfast this week for her inauguration as Queen’s University chancellor

Megan Burns

7 helpful steps to making your foundation look its best
7 helpful steps to making your foundation look its best

Melanie Morris

The teaser trailer for the new Sex and The City Reboot is here!
The teaser trailer for the new Sex and The City Reboot is here!

Jennifer McShane

Girlfriend Collective: The ethical sportswear brand that TikTok is loving
Girlfriend Collective: The ethical sportswear brand that TikTok is loving

Sarah Finnan

Image / Editorial

Forcing Yourself To Consider The ‘Bright Side’ Of Work Could Really Help


by Jennifer McShane
13th Sep 2015
blank

It’s Sunday night, and that can mean one thing: The Fear. As we approach a new week, even those of us who adore our jobs will no doubt?have days where we will all need to vent when we finish our working day. A simple “how was your day?” can be enough to set off a metaphoric stream of fireworks that results in us feeling stressed, drained and unable to switch off for even a few hours. It’s human nature to dwell on the negative, but a new study is suggesting that you might be all the better for channelling your energies into positive thoughts when it comes to your working environment, thus leading to greater job satisfaction.

Writing in the?Harvard Business Review, a trio of researchers?proposed an alternative, called the ‘Three Good Things’ intervention, something they said was typically used to improve the moods of the mildly depressed. Summarising their research, which was published in the Journal Academy of Management, the researchers, led by Joyce E. Bono of the University of Florida, wrote?that they tried a version of this for three weeks with a group that usually does have some real, actual problems to complain about: nurses and other employees at an outpatient family-practice clinic. That’s not to discount any other jobs, but these particular employees were used for the purpose of the research.

“What most people don’t realise is that positive experiences – even small ones – provide you with valuable resources that can be used to reduce stress, including physical symptoms such as headaches or muscle tension. They make it easier for you to detach yourself from work at the end of the day,” they explained.

Their research worked like this: after work, for just five to ten minutes, the participants were to write about the good things, however big or small, that happened to them that day. The responses ranged from the mundane (Woo, it’s Friday!) to the more substantial, like the nurse for example, who said she received a compliment from a doctor and was was proud of herself for knowing exactly what to do for a patient who had?a seizure. Following the three-week period, their self-reported stress levels were lower than when they’d started, and they also told the researchers that they had an easier time detaching from work at the end of the day.

Sharing positive events with others creates connections between people and bonds them with one another, further reducing evening stress.

Brief as the research was, those who conducted the study made valid points as to why focusing on the positive little things really?can make?a big difference to your working day and general career outlook: “This simple practice – writing about three good things that happened – creates a real shift in what people think about, and can change how they perceive their work lives,” the researchers continued.

“It can also create a feedback loop that enhances its impact: we believe that people who reflect on good things that happened during the day are more likely to share those things with family and friends. Sharing positive events with others creates connections between people and bonds them with one another, further reducing evening stress. Ultimately, this also improves sleep, which our ongoing research suggests leads to greater alertness and better mood – which in turn leads to more positive things happening the next day, and further job satisfaction and happiness.”

It is unlikely that people will stop talking about negative experiences at work, but they maintain (with good reason) that intentionally focusing on positive events can provide that essential work balance. “We don’t advocate putting up happy posters, but companies can take steps to intelligently help people notice and share positive experiences, which could benefit everybody,” they concluded.

Research has indicated that being negative at work will drain your mental energy and it’s true. It takes a hell of a lot more energy to focus on bad thoughts over good ones, and you’d be surprised at the results that come from yielding positive energy – both for yourself and those around you.

Something to think on as you start your working week tomorrow.

Via Harvard Business Review

Also Read

blank
EDITORIAL
“A slap in the face for all the victims”: Outcry over Bill Cosby’s release from prison

This is why rape victims think twice before coming forward, writes Amanda Cassidy He was once known as “America’s Dad”...

By Amanda Cassidy

blank
EDITORIAL
This spatchcock chicken recipe will make your weekend

This is a great way to get a juicy roast chicken, bursting with flavour.     Bord Bia’s Spatchcock Chicken...

By Meg Walker

brain
EDITORIAL
8 easy ways to keep your brain healthy that you can do right now

Your brain health is just as important as that of the rest of your body, says psychologist and neuroscientist Dr...

By IMAGE

Keith-_-Tara_130_Web Shantanu Starick painting kitchen cabinets
EDITORIAL
How to limit drips and brush strokes while painting kitchen cabinets

Painting kitchen cabinets can be transformative and can be achieved relatively low-cost, but you need the right equipment, and a lot of...

By Amanda Kavanagh

blank
EDITORIAL
‘We have not heeded the warnings sufficiently’: The health emergency we’ve ignored while focusing on the pandemic

The climate change debate has been going on for so long its become white noise. But this week, the effects...

By Amanda Cassidy

blank
EDITORIAL
‘Totally allowed but totally shouldn’t: Welcome to the Great Irish Pandemic Paradox’

In a time when cool heads are needed – it’s more than the current heatwave that’s melting minds, writes Amanda...

By Amanda Cassidy

blank
AGENDA, EDITORIAL
When speaking about ageing, we should follow Julianne Moore’s lead

Actress Julianne Moore is tired of all the cliched tropes about female ageing. The way we speak about it; the...

By Jennifer McShane