Tom Daley knit his gold medal an Olympic cosy and it’s the most wholesome thing you’ll see all day
Tom Daley knit his gold medal an Olympic cosy and it’s the most wholesome thing...

Sarah Finnan

Only four women have ever won Olympic medals for Ireland, but four more joined the list last night
Only four women have ever won Olympic medals for Ireland, but four more joined the...

Lauren Heskin

6 brilliant Netflix picks that you NEED to binge-watch in August
6 brilliant Netflix picks that you NEED to binge-watch in August

Jennifer McShane

The best affordable bridal outfits for your big day
The best affordable bridal outfits for your big day

Sarah Finnan

‘I was still doing it for other people’: Simone Biles put her mental health first – and it should be applauded
‘I was still doing it for other people’: Simone Biles put her mental health first...

Jennifer McShane

Will filter free images be a legacy of the pandemic?
Will filter free images be a legacy of the pandemic?

Rose Mary Roche

Morning of the wedding: 9 dos and don’ts for the bridal party
Morning of the wedding: 9 dos and don’ts for the bridal party

Geraldine Carton

What to eat this week: Goat’s cheese and pickled beetroot melt
What to eat this week: Goat’s cheese and pickled beetroot melt

Meg Walker

The most heartwarming moments from the Olympics so far
The most heartwarming moments from the Olympics so far

Sarah Finnan

11 Irish women with the coolest jobs outside Ireland
11 Irish women with the coolest jobs outside Ireland

Geraldine Carton

Image / Editorial

Katherine Zappone donates her wedding dress to the National Museum


by Grace McGettigan
17th Jan 2019

Ireland’s minister for children and youth affairs, Katherine Zappone, has generously donated both her and her wife’s wedding dresses to the National Museum of Ireland. The dresses will be on display at Collins Barracks as a symbol of Irish history.

Katherine married the love of her life, Dr Ann Louise Gilligan, in January 2016. Despite being together for 35 years, and despite wanting to get married in Ireland sooner, the lack of marriage equality in this country meant their wedding was off the cards.

Marriage equality

The women were a constant force in the struggle for equal marriage rights; fighting hard for the Irish legal system to recognise their 2003 Canadian marriage. Their actions reignited a debate which eventually led to the establishment of civil partnership rights, and later the Marriage Equality referendum of 2015.

Related: FBI finds Judy Garland’s ruby slippers
13 years after they were stolen 

That year, Ireland made history; becoming the first state to legalise same-sex marriage by popular vote. Just two months after the referendum passed, Katherine and Ann Louise tied the knot in Dublin Castle.

Sadly, Ann Louise passed away in June 2017. She left a valuable legacy through her work in the area of adult education, particularly for disadvantaged women in Ireland.

Their wedding dresses

Since her passing, Katherine has kindly decided to donate their wedding dresses to the National Museum’s Contemporary Ireland Collection, which collects and preserves items of importance to our nation throughout the history of the Irish Republic to the present day.

Katherine Zappone via National Museum of IrelandPhoto: Katherine Zappone via National Museum of Ireland

In a statement, museum curator Brenda Malone said, “As the wedding dresses become part of the NMI collections, they represent Katherine and Ann Louise’s love and life together, and their personal struggle for equal recognition.

“In a wider sense, they also represent the Irish LGBTQ community’s struggle for equality, and the Irish nation’s story of social change. The NMI is committed to recording and preserving these stories.”

What’s more, museum director Lynn Scarff said, “The National Museum is actively collecting the history of Irish society and its recent developments in order to tell Ireland’s story into the future.

“We are honoured by Minister Zappone’s donation of her and her wife’s wedding dresses and what they represent. Through this gift and future collecting, the museum takes an important step forward in representing all members of Irish society.”

Admission to the National Museum of Ireland is free. For opening times, visit museum.ie.

Photo: WikiCommons

Also Read

EDITORIAL
This is what happens when you hypersexualise young girls growing up

Who is demanding the fetishization of young girls anyway?”When I was working in my early twenties, and even my late...

By Amanda Cassidy

EDITORIAL
Nutritionist Daniel Davey’s harissa squash with giant couscous

This is a perfect lunch recipe, and the harissa does an incredible job of bringing the squash and chicken to...

By Meg Walker

EDITORIAL
‘Suddenly alive again’: The heartbreaking joy of finding a deceased loved one on Google Maps street view

“I look at my mum’s old house on Google maps street view, the house where I grew up. It says...

By Amanda Cassidy

abgc_architects_aoife_herrity
EDITORIAL
A plain extension in Dublin 8 provides a blank canvas for a design-minded couple

ABGC Architects were enlisted to transform a large white box into a functional living space for two design-minded homeowners. When...

By Amanda Kavanagh

AGENDA, EDITORIAL
Andrew McGinley: ‘I know that they wouldn’t want me to be sad.’

Following the utterly devastating trial of his wife Deirdre last week, Andrew McGinley spoke afterward of the love of his...

By Jennifer McShane

toxic
EDITORIAL
How to let go of toxic people, and the signs to recognise

By Niamh Ennis

audiobooks
EDITORIAL
6 brilliant audiobooks worth listening to during lockdown

Six great audiobooks to listen to in lockdown. It took me ages to come around to the idea of audiobooks....

By Jennifer McShane