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Image / Editorial

‘It was intense. It was pink. And it was magical. My first Business of Beauty Awards’


by Edaein OConnell
11th Mar 2019
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As I painted myself with foundation yesterday evening – with one eye on the rugby match, of course – I wondered what the night ahead would hold for me.

Would my foundation last into the wee hours? Would I survive in my high heels? Would I make it to Coppers?

I have been part of Team IMAGE for nine months now and I’ve experienced my fair share of IMAGE events. From podcast launches to networking breakfasts, and even the IMAGE Businesswoman of the Year Awards, I presumed I had been around the block.

However, I had not yet experienced the crème de la crème: the Business of Beauty Awards (or ‘BOB’, as it is affectionately known around the office).

An experience

I had been forewarned by colleagues that it would be nothing like what I’d experienced before. They said to prepare myself for madness, but I paid no heed to these warnings.

So off I went with my sparkly ‘Elton John’ suit and hair perfectly coiffed; expecting a somewhat chilled but glamourous event. I ultimately found myself in a high-octane, flamingo-filled, tropical pink fairytale. And this was before the guests had even arrived.

Related: The Business of Beauty Awards 2019 –
the winners are…

The room was empty, but there was a distinct feeling that madness was about to descend.

And descend it did, at full speed, in false tan and high heels.

Female solidarity

In minutes, I found myself in a crowd of immaculately turned out individuals. I was blinded by highlighted cheekbones and felt envious of streakless tan. Even though I was in a get-up so sparkly it could be seen from space, I felt exceptionally underdressed.

There were glasses of bubbles, colourful photo walls, and a pink carpet.

The solidarity of female companionship was evident from the get-go; the lengths women were going to get the perfect ‘#ootd’ outfit shots for their friends. Even in gowns, women were like special agents on the ground trying to get the perfect angle – and it made me proud.

 

There were drummers in kilts with beats you could feel in your bones, and shirtless men carrying host Darren Kennedy on a pink throne. There were screams, some tears, dance-offs and sing-offs. There was dancing on chairs and bags of crisps secretly eaten under the table.

There were Instagram boomerangs, hashtags, selfies and stories. It was truly a feast for the senses.

Magical

There was what seemed like an eternal wait for the girls’ bathroom, but it was in this wait you made friends for life (or more realistically, until the after party was over). There were secret conversations of heartbreak or lost texts. There were confidence building exercises completed at the sinks while girls topped up their make-up.

And there were hugs, double cheek kisses and more screams.

It was intense. It was pink. And it was magical. My colleagues told me it would be an experience, and they were absolutely right.

So, what became of me at the end of my very first BOB?

Well, my foundation was patchy, my feet were in agony and I made it to Coppers.

And you know what? I’d do it all over again.

Photo: Business of Beauty Awards 2019, IMAGE Publications


More like this: 

  • The Business of Beauty Awards 2019: the winners are… here.
  • The IMAGE Business of Beauty Awards 2019 — our best bits (including the best outfits)… here.
  • ‘Less is more’: Five beauty mantras Irish beauty professionals live by… here.

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