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Image / Fashion

Donatella Versace: ‘I don’t want to kill animals to make fashion’


By Niamh ODonoghue
16th Mar 2018
Donatella Versace: ‘I don’t want to kill animals to make fashion’

This year has been the year of awakening and it’s been welcomed wholeheartedly. Already we’ve witnessed a wave of bloggers and influencers say no to the beauty industries efforts to test on animals; conversations about harmful beauty products clogging our oceans and water ecosystems; and a crackdown on fur and brands passing real, cheap fur as “faux”.

Now, fashion house Versace has joined the growing list of brands who’ve pledged to stop killing animals for fashion. In an interview for The Economist’s 1843 magazine, Donatella Versace, the brand’s vice president and chief designer said, “Fur? I am out of that. I don’t want to kill animals to make fashion. It doesn’t feel right.” The news came hours after fellow Italian brand Furla announced that they would cease using fur going further, beginning with its cruise 2019 collection.

The news is a reminder that in order to be successful in the fashion world, you don’t need to contribute to the barbaric treatment of animals or the destruction of the planet. The use of fur is increasingly out-of-touch with today’s buyer and isolates the few remaining top-shelf designers who continue to create garments from fur farms. It’s still important to remember, however, that it takes around 6,800 litres of water to grow enough cotton to produce just one pair of regular blue jeans. Congratulations to Versace on taking proactive steps towards a cruel-free industry.

Here are some of our favourite animal-friendly, kind-to-the-universe brands:

Want to keep up-to-date with fashion trends but be kind to humanity and the planet in the process? Try this vegan clobber on for size.