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Image / Beauty

Skin Wars: Psoriasis


by Melanie Morris
22nd Apr 2016

backstage ahead of the Ermanno Scervino show during Milan Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2016 on September 26, 2015 in Milan, Italy.

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It’s one thing to suffer from everyday issues like dehydration, clarity and lines, but what if your skin is higher-maintenance and your problems need more specific solutions? MELANIE MORRIS and specialist dermatology nurse Selene Daly examine the most common Irish skin complaints and address how to handle them.

READ MORE: Skin Wars: Contact Dermatitis

Psoriasis

WHAT’S GOING ON HERE?

Psoriasis begins internally when the immune system triggers the body to produce more skin cells than normal. A typical skin cell cycle lasts between 21-28 days, but with psoriasis, the skin regenerates every two to six days. It causes cells to build up rapidly on the surface of the skin, forming thick, silvery scales and itchy, dry, red patches. Psoriasis commonly affects the elbows, knees, and scalp. It has many different appearances: It may be small, flattened bumps; large, thick plaques of raised skin; red patches; pink, mildly dry skin; or big flakes. It may also affect the nails and cause thickened, broken nails, which can appear discoloured. It can vary in severity from person to person, and can come and go. Psoriasis is a chronic condition that usually runs in families, and while it is not curable, there are effective medical treatments. It is also linked to a higher risk of heart disease, arthritis and depression. Alcohol, certain medications, strep throats and stress can all trigger psoriasis.

READ MORE: Skin Wars: Eczema

WHAT?S THE SOLUTION?

Firstly, it is important to establish a good topical routine, and all persons with psoriasis should use total emollient therapy. This means always using a soap substitute to wash, and a moisturiser. This can be used in combination with topical steroids. The second phase of treatment are specific oral medications, and the third is treatment with biologic medications, which are self-injected. It is important if you do have psoriasis to engage with your GP or dermatologist in order to get the proper medical care.

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PRODUCTS TO TRY

For a super-rich moisture feed,Dr Murad’s Hydro-Dynamic Ultimate Moisture is an intensely hydrating formula packed with nourishing oils like coconut and avocado to lock in hydration for 24 hours.

This article originally appeared in the May issue of IMAGE, on shelves now.