The most explosive moments from the Coleen Rooney and Rebekah Vardy libel trial
The most explosive moments from the Coleen Rooney and Rebekah Vardy libel trial

Sarah Gill

The best tan drops for make-up free, sun-kissed skin
The best tan drops for make-up free, sun-kissed skin

Holly O'Neill

It seems as though churning out TikToks is now part and parcel of being a musician
It seems as though churning out TikToks is now part and parcel of being a...

Sarah Gill

This Irish book subscription box will help you sort your next great summer read
This Irish book subscription box will help you sort your next great summer read

Sarah Finnan

What is colloidal oatmeal and should I be using it?
What is colloidal oatmeal and should I be using it?

Shayna Sappington

IMAGE Weekender: Inside the cosy new wine bar in Dublin 4
IMAGE Weekender: Inside the cosy new wine bar in Dublin 4

Sarah Finnan

What to stream online this weekend 
What to stream online this weekend 

Sarah Finnan

The Diary: Social pictures from the No7 Boots Pro Derm Scan event
The Diary: Social pictures from the No7 Boots Pro Derm Scan event

Sarah Gill

WIN 4 tickets to the Black Eyed Peas concert
WIN 4 tickets to the Black Eyed Peas concert

IMAGE

Gaining weight for a part is good but wearing a ‘fat suit’ is bad? Unpacking the Reneé Zellweger backlash
Gaining weight for a part is good but wearing a ‘fat suit’ is bad? Unpacking...

Sarah Finnan

Image / Living / Culture
premium
LIVING

How could so many women vanish in Ireland and never be found?


by Jennifer McShane
27th Apr 2022
blank

This is an extract from Claire McGowen's new book, The Vanishing Triangle: The Murdered Women Ireland Forgot. It tells of the disappearance of eight Irish women in the early nineties, all who seemingly vanished without a trace. But the Northern Irish author knows there's more to it.

“In the nineties, Ireland was also going through rapid economic change, officially joining the euro in 1999. After centuries of emigration, finally this was reversed, and even now almost 3 per cent of the population is from Poland alone. The Celtic Tiger – the name given to Ireland’s booming economy at this time – meant lots of building work. Lots of places to hide a body. The bust in 2008 has left half-built ghost estates...

You have reached a premium article.

For unlimited digital access to the stories worth paying for, subscribe now to IMAGE from just €4.99 a month
Subscribe