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Image / Living / Culture
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LIVING

How could so many women vanish in Ireland and never be found?


by Jennifer McShane
27th Apr 2022

This is an extract from Claire McGowen's new book, The Vanishing Triangle: The Murdered Women Ireland Forgot. It tells of the disappearance of eight Irish women in the early nineties, all who seemingly vanished without a trace. But the Northern Irish author knows there's more to it.

“In the nineties, Ireland was also going through rapid economic change, officially joining the euro in 1999. After centuries of emigration, finally this was reversed, and even now almost 3 per cent of the population is from Poland alone. The Celtic Tiger – the name given to Ireland’s booming economy at this time – meant lots of building work. Lots of places to hide a body. The bust in 2008 has left half-built ghost estates...

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