As midlife women, it’s time to embrace the power of positive ageing
As midlife women, it’s time to embrace the power of positive ageing

Ellie Balfe

Thinking of making a career change? These are the books you should read first
Thinking of making a career change? These are the books you should read first

Erin Lindsay

This picturesque, split-level home in Delgany is on the market for €995,000
This picturesque, split-level home in Delgany is on the market for €995,000

Sarah Finnan

How I Got Here: Pamela O’Neill, head of the dispute management at Eversheds Sutherland
How I Got Here: Pamela O’Neill, head of the dispute management at Eversheds Sutherland

Megan Burns

Supper Club: Kevin Dundon’s courgette and feta pasta salad
Supper Club: Kevin Dundon’s courgette and feta pasta salad

IMAGE

A seafront Skerries home has been given a luxe update with rich colours and hotel-inspired details
A seafront Skerries home has been given a luxe update with rich colours and hotel-inspired...

Megan Burns

Paul Carlucci: ‘There’s no better investment than buying books and letting yourself be swept away’
Paul Carlucci: ‘There’s no better investment than buying books and letting yourself be swept away’

Sarah Gill

The secrets to marriage and relationships according to couples together 10, 20, 30 and 40 years
The secrets to marriage and relationships according to couples together 10, 20, 30 and 40...

Amanda Cassidy

This peaceful Victorian-era Galway home is on the market for €1.65 million
This peaceful Victorian-era Galway home is on the market for €1.65 million

Sarah Finnan

Ask the Doctor: ‘Is there a device similar to a leadless single-chamber pacemaker that can be fitted to the atrium?’
Ask the Doctor: ‘Is there a device similar to a leadless single-chamber pacemaker that can...

Sarah Gill

Image / Self / Health & Wellness

New study reveals we are able to ‘catch’ moods from our friends


By Amanda Cassidy
25th Jan 2021

Unsplash

New study reveals we are able to ‘catch’ moods from our friends

Hello Hello

According to the research, negative feelings are much more ‘contagious’ than positive ones.


“You’ve put me in bad form” is my go-to expression when I’m rowing with my husband. But it turns out I’m not entirely being unreasonable.

A study carried out by the brains at Oxford and Bermingham Universities has concluded that emotional contagion, in this case among teens, is a real phenomenon.

The research set out to see the impact of individuals’ moods within a shared social network.

Tolerance

It found that moods become similar to those of the people they spend time with. What’s interesting about this is that there was also a tolerance of different moods, meaning grumpy teenagers are no less popular with their peers than those with a more upbeat personality.

According to The Guardian, research was based on two musical ensembles involving musicians aged 15-19 who took part in concert tours abroad. During the course of the tour in the summer of 2018, each of the 79 participants kept a diary recording daily moods and social interactions.

Author of the report; Dr Per Block says that the investigation “shows conclusively that individuals are affected by how others around them are feeling. Mood is contagious, and though both positive and negative moods are ‘caught’, bad moods are more potent.”

This contradicts earlier studies in which those with a sunnier disposition rubbed off positively on others.

Catching

Although this study also showed that although a teenager runs the risk of catching a friend’s bad mood, they can also influence them with their own more positive mood and lift them out of their misery.

“We hope it is a step towards understanding why people fall into prolonged low states, the social factors that determine emotional wellbeing in adolescents, and, in the long run, how it may be possible to provide emotional support leading to improved mental health,” said Block.

So it’s good news – as long as it is moods spreading amongst teens instead of The Unmentionable.

Image via Unsplash.com