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Image / Editorial

The VVIPs 2013


by IMAGE
22nd Apr 2013
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A bevvy of Ireland’s foremost socialites, media supremos and people-about-town were out in full force, as the fourth and final Smirnoff VVIP awards took place in Abbey Street’s Academy Theatre, themed ?We Dreamed a Dream?. The annual tongue-in-cheek awards ceremony toasts the best and boldest of Irish who’s who and is a much-anticipated anti-party, sans guest list or invite. Attendees were greeted by a fashion police TV crew on the red carpet before being served Smirnoff cocktails indoors, where ice and sand celebrity sculptures took pride of place in the reception room. Upstairs, model du jour Daniella Moyles and club promoter Buzz O?Neill co-hosted an evening of fantastical fun, awarding coveted accolades, including Party Girl of the Year (Anastasia Campion), I Can’t Believe It’s a Business (Tropical Popical at CrackBird), and VVIP of the Year (Bressie), to name just a few. Nominees and partygoers including Love/Hate‘s Peter Coonan, The Voice of Ireland‘s Kathryn Thomas, and PR team Thinkhouse enjoyed a string of theatrical performances from Bressie’s cover of ?Addicted to Love? to a fleet of Lincoln-inspired dancers and a fabulous Les Mis?rables finale, with confetti canons and balloons. TV presenters Laura Whitmore and Darren Kennedy arrived fashionably late to the bash, just in time to see organisers Anthony Remedy, Brian Spollen, Una Mullally, Brian Barnes, Cian Byrne and Buzz O?Neill take to the stage for a final bow as the curtains closed for the last time on the most resplendent party of the year.

 

For more images, see the May issue of IMAGE.

 

PHOTOGRAPHS BY PAT O’LEARY

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