Travelling with kids: what you need to know before going away this summer
Travelling with kids: what you need to know before going away this summer

Sarah Finnan

Try this crispy elderflower cocktail this bank holiday weekend
Try this crispy elderflower cocktail this bank holiday weekend

Holly O'Neill

What to do when your boss is a bully
What to do when your boss is a bully

Colette Sexton

Filming has begun on the TV adaptation of Graham Norton’s debut novel down in West Cork
Filming has begun on the TV adaptation of Graham Norton’s debut novel down in West...

Sarah Finnan

8 engrossing Netflix picks worth starting this long weekend
8 engrossing Netflix picks worth starting this long weekend

Jennifer McShane

Rihanna is about to release Fenty Parfum
Rihanna is about to release Fenty Parfum

Holly O'Neill

House of Gucci: The explosive true story behind Lady Gaga’s upcoming crime biopic
House of Gucci: The explosive true story behind Lady Gaga’s upcoming crime biopic

Jennifer McShane

Rosemary MacCabe: ‘I thought I’d accepted my body – then I got pregnant’
Rosemary MacCabe: ‘I thought I’d accepted my body – then I got pregnant’

Rosemary MacCabe

‘Hello? Where is Fergie?’: Sarah Ferguson offered her help to ‘The Crown’… but they declined
‘Hello? Where is Fergie?’: Sarah Ferguson offered her help to ‘The Crown’… but they declined

Sarah Finnan

Westlife’s Mark Feehily is selling his Sligo lakeside home for €1.15 million
Westlife’s Mark Feehily is selling his Sligo lakeside home for €1.15 million

Megan Burns

Image / Editorial

Sharing is caring: how to make your job share work for you


by Colette Sexton
22nd May 2018
blank

Fancy the idea of a job share but not sure how to make it work? Colette Sexton, news correspondent at the Sunday Business Post, has you covered.

Job sharing is a relatively new phenomenon in Ireland but the desire for flexibility in work is growing, particularly among younger generations and as a result, workplaces are forced to respond to demands.

The 2018 Deloitte Millennial report found those born between 1983 and 1994 believe that employers that offer more flexibility than they previously did achieve greater profits and provide work environments that are more stimulating, healthy and satisfying. And Irish employers are cottoning on to this, 65 per cent of the 373 companies surveyed for the the IBEC Flexible Working Arrangements Report 2016 had flexible working arrangements in place.

This marks a big change on even 20 years ago.  

Catherine Corcoran, head of management consulting at accounting and business advisory firm RSM Ireland, remembers the early days of Irish job sharing.

“I remember in 1997 attending a town hall meeting where two teachers were interviewed by the parents of fourth class as to how they would make a proposed job-share work. The parish priest facilitated the meeting and the teachers had quite a job to convince. Thankfully things have changed since then!”

When she was a HR manager in the public sector in the late 90s, Catherine worked on a job-sharing arrangement. She worked 2.5 days per week and her fellow job sharer did the same.

“It was one of the first senior roles that was approved for job-sharing in the sector and there was some if not a lot of scepticism as to whether we would make it work,” she said. “I think job-sharing has become much more acceptable now in the workplace and probably easier in terms of colleagues’ acceptance so good handovers and communication and a ‘results’ focus should make it work.”

Catherine and her job-sharer kept a diary of all important conversations and events, had a daily handover and briefed each other by phone as necessary.

“We were so seamless that I was able to continue conversations my job-sharer had the day before as if it had been me having the conversation.”

Want to emulate Catherine’s successful job-share experience? It’s important to leave your ego outside – this is not a competition, it is a coalition. Communication is vital – not just between the job-sharers but also between all other stakeholders involved. It can be very frustrating to expect a response from one person only to hear from someone else entirely. It is important to be patient. Job sharing will take a while to get used to. Check in with one another regularly and ensure both of you, and your employer, are happy with how it is going. Make sure that each of you have a fair share of the “fun” work and of the grunt work. Finally, enjoy it. Make the most of your time in work and your time outside of work and just be thankful that your job share didn’t have to be approved by the local priest!

Think you need more flexibility in your work life? You might want to check this article out, too.

Also Read

blank
EDITORIAL
Nutritionist Daniel Davey’s harissa squash with giant couscous

This is a perfect lunch recipe, and the harissa does an incredible job of bringing the squash and chicken to...

By Meg Walker

blank
EDITORIAL
‘We have not heeded the warnings sufficiently’: The health emergency we’ve ignored while focusing on the pandemic

The climate change debate has been going on for so long its become white noise. But this week, the effects...

By Amanda Cassidy

blank
EDITORIAL
The Howth train attack represents a lawlessness that makes me fear for my daughters

I fear the true fallout of Covid on our cities is just getting started, writes Amanda Cassidy As the pandemic...

By Amanda Cassidy

blank
EDITORIAL
‘Why do we keep snatching normality away from our children?’

This summer the government will allow my children into a bar, but not to their gymnastics camp. Amanda Cassidy on...

By Amanda Cassidy

blank
AGENDA, EDITORIAL
TV presenter Kate Garraway says husband Derek is still “devastated by Covid”

Kate Garraway’s devastating Covid story is a reminder of why we must keep each other in mind as an invisible...

By Jennifer McShane

stress
EDITORIAL
Are you up the walls? How the language of stress causes stress

Do you find yourself talking about how busy and stressed you are? With stress, the words we speak are like...

By Sophie White

blank
CULTURE
Reality Bites: TV shows like Love Island are warping our minds

It may be the most unifying show on television, but shows like Love Island are promoting some pretty damaging messages....

By Amanda Cassidy