Amy Adams and Patrick Dempsey are in Ireland – and of course, there’s a Jedward connection
Amy Adams and Patrick Dempsey are in Ireland – and of course, there’s a Jedward...

Sarah Finnan

Extra chewing gum vibes off Harry Style’s ‘Watermelon Sugar’ in their post-Covid ad dedicated to touching
Extra chewing gum vibes off Harry Style’s ‘Watermelon Sugar’ in their post-Covid ad dedicated to...

Sarah Finnan

The step-by-step guide to laying a chic summer tablescape
The step-by-step guide to laying a chic summer tablescape

Holly O'Neill

According to science, there is one way to upgrade your biscuit break
According to science, there is one way to upgrade your biscuit break

Shayna Sappington

5 mobile apps to help you save money now
5 mobile apps to help you save money now

IMAGE

Here’s exactly what to look for in your eye cream depending on your issue
Here’s exactly what to look for in your eye cream depending on your issue

Melanie Morris

7 new must-sees we can’t wait to watch this year
7 new must-sees we can’t wait to watch this year

Jennifer McShane

Image / Editorial

Sarcastic People Are More Creative And Smarter


by Jeanne Sutton
27th Jul 2015
blank

Sarcasm is often dismissed by those with no sense of humour as the lowest form of wit. However, it turns out that being a regular Chandler Bing actually means you are generally smarter than most, and you’re a more creative soul.

A study just published in the journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes‘studied 300 people by observing their sarcasm levels during a series of experiments. Before completing tasks, such as securing a candle to the wall with just a box of matches and some nails while not dripping wax on the floor, researchers noted which participants made sarcastic comments. Those who approached their mission with a degree of side-eye tended to be better at finding solutions, with a pretty good completion rate of 64%. And if you heard a sarcastic comment, that only spurred you to better, with 75% of people subjected to ironic comments managing to overcome mini-Herculean tasks. See – sometimes slagging is healthy.

The study, which combined research from Harvard and Columbia University, says that the reason sarcasm has such a bountiful effect is because it prompts abstract thinking, which in turn leads to new and better ideas. “We found that sarcasm may stimulate creativity, the generation of ideas, insights, or problem solutions that are novel and useful. As Oscar Wilde believed, sarcasm may represent a lower form of wit, but we found that it certainly catalyses a higher form of thought,” said?Dr Li Huang, who headed up the research.

So go forth! And be a little bit bold, you might just help someone with that sharp tongue of yours.

Via Metro

 

Also Read

blank
EDITORIAL
MHQ: ‘Before we put more countries on the list, we must know how they will be taken off’

By Amanda Cassidy

blank
EDITORIAL
What to eat this weekend: Fish n’ courgette chips with homemade tartar sauce

This healthy fish and courgette chips recipe from Jane Kennedy...

By Meg Walker

blank
EDITORIAL
“You’re weird Mammy… other mothers iron”: Author Elske Rahill on writing and motherhood

“Every baby costs you a book” – that’s something women...

By IMAGE

blank
EDITORIAL
Is marketplace feminism stealing the limelight from real female-driven issues?

‘Femertising’ is big business. Brands are increasingly taking advantage of...

By Amanda Cassidy

shells cafe
EDITORIAL
A Sligo cottage is transformed into a cool and cosy surfers’ haven

Still one of our favourite homes ever, the easy-breezy interiors...

By IMAGE Interiors & Living

Keith-_-Tara_130_Web Shantanu Starick painting kitchen cabinets
EDITORIAL
How to limit drips and brush strokes while painting kitchen cabinets

Painting kitchen cabinets can be transformative and can be achieved relatively low-cost,...

By Amanda Kavanagh

Taylor Swift
EDITORIAL
I was not a fan of Taylor Swift. Then I watched her documentary

The documentary Miss Americana has shown a different side to...

By Edaein OConnell