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Image / Editorial

Must-read: A ten-year-old girl wrote a beautiful backwards poem to highlight dyslexia


By Jennifer McShane
28th Feb 2019
Must-read: A ten-year-old girl wrote a beautiful backwards poem to highlight dyslexia

Social media most definitely has a dark side, but every so often it does, as Marie Kondo says, spark joy.

This is one of those moments in the form of a poignant poem written by a 10-year-old girl.

The verse has warmed hearts online for its insight into the treatment of people with dyslexia and double-meaning.

Teacher Jane Broadis shared the verse on Twitter on Wednesday evening and it has gone viral with the tweet being liked more than 129,000 times since.

Related: Retrained reflexes in children and why you might be mistaking them for ADHD 

She shared the post, hoping it would gain traction to highlight the poem, which is profound and insightful – the fact that it was written by a schoolgirl of just 10-years-old makes it all the more impressive.

At first, the poem seems to be despairing. But, when read in reverse, it becomes the opposite; a rallying of hope and positivity in just a few sentences.

The poem reads:

“I am stupid.
Nobody should ever say
I have a talent for words

“I was meant to be great.
That is wrong
I am a failure

“Nobody could ever convince me to think that
I can make it in life.”

With almost 2,000 comments on the tweet, it’s obvious that it resonated with many, particularly those who have dyslexia.


Main photograph: Pexels