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Image / Editorial

Irish Cut Glass Revival


by IMAGE
11th Sep 2014
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Setting the standard for indigenous makers, J. Hill’s Standard is a new Waterford company making hand-crafted contemporary cut crystal – reviving centuries-old methods passed down through generations of skilled craftspeople?

Be sure to check out Elements, one of the collections new Irish hand-cut crystal company J. Hill’s Standard – which uses traditional mouth-blown glass – commissioned specially for its launch last month. Designed by in-demand Dutch duo Scholten & Baijings and produced in Waterford, the captivating collection is an ode to light and elegance.

Stefan Scholten and Carole Baijings

Above: Dutch designers?Scholten & Baijings

The new Irish company – who are filling the creative vacuum left by the demise of the venerable Waterford Crystal – chose the Amsterdam-based design team for their distinct graphic lines and beautifully balanced use of colour. Stefan?Scholten?and Carole?Baijings?then developed a palette of ?cuts? to be applied to the crystal in combination with layers of texture and tone. The idea was to create a whole new take on the typical Irish cut glass, with each glass in the series having a different design, letting the customer customise their own collection.

Waterford is synonymous with hand-cut crystal, and at one time was home to 120 furnaces and 3,500 craftsmen. Alas there are now only a small number of workshops practising traditional making methods, so J. Hill’s Standard’s goal is to revive the craft, create a sustainable business and even set up a glass-blowing school in the future, all of which will hopefully draw glass professionals from around the world to the area as a hub for research and development. Here’s to Waterford being a cut above once more.

Do you collect cool crystal? Let us know on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram!

For more great people putting the focus back on craft, check out our interview with Jonathan Legge from Makers and Brothers here.

Sheenagh Green for @image_interiors