Author Ruth Gilligan: ‘I have slowly colonised our flat’s small second bedroom into my writing...

Sophie Grenham

About 400,000 women in Ireland have this condition and don’t know

IMAGE

The Cabinet Sub-Committee on Covid-19 currently has no women sitting on it. Why?

Lynn Enright

And now Dermaplaning. When will it be okay for women to have hair?

Kate Demolder

Porn addiction: ‘It was like having another relationship. It was affecting me physically and I...

Michelle Heffernan

This utterly dreamy Victorian home just outside of Belfast is on the market for £995,000

Megan Burns

Add some zing to your home with this bright Pop Art-inspired collection

Shayna Sappington

These are the Netflix picks we can’t wait for in March

Jennifer McShane

Let’s set the table: make mealtimes feel more special with these flourishing touches

Megan Burns

Image / Editorial

Healthy Living: The Simple Diagram That Explains Japan’s Life Expectancy


by IMAGE
28th Mar 2016

Not that we really needed a study to point this out, but if you’ve ever wondered why Japan’s life expectancy is so much higher than the rest of the world, it’s a lot simpler than you think: diet.

Two new studies caught our attention this weekend. The first study claimed that less than 3% of Americans are living what would be medically accepted as a ‘healthy lifestyle’, which is very worrying, and we hate to think of what the figure are over here in Ireland but here’s hoping we’re not quite that bad. The second study, plain and simply links healthy eating in Japan to a much longer life.

By analysing food and lifestyle questionnaires completed by 36,624 men and 42,920 women aged between 45 and 75 (for 15 solid years), none of whom had any history of cancer, stroke, heart or chronic liver diseases, the researchers arrived at some informative conclusions.

Those who followed the healthy eating guide, recommended by the Japanese government, enjoyed a 15 per cent lower mortality rate.

What’s more, they were less likely to have cerebrovascular vascular disease: a term, explained by the Independent who are reporting on the study, is used to describe conditions caused by problem with blood supply to the brain.

?Our findings suggest that balanced consumption of energy, grains, vegetables, fruits, meat, fish, eggs, soy products, dairy products, confectionaries, and alcoholic beverages can contribute to longevity by decreasing the risk of death, predominantly from cardiovascular disease, in the Japanese population.?

Check out their simple and easy-to-follow guide here:

food-spinner-japan

Also Read

Elizabeth Day
EDITORIAL
Elizabeth Day: ‘Life is full of failure. But it’s never too late to change your life’

Failure is a natural element of the cycle of life....

By Jennifer McShane

ultimate guide to home renovation
EDITORIAL
Here’s what you need to know to avoid a hellish (and budget-busting) home renovation

After undergoing her own home overhaul, interior designer and architect...

By IMAGE Interiors & Living

deal with grief
EDITORIAL
6 books, plays and podcasts to help you deal with grief

Death is a natural part of life, yet there’s no...

By Grace McGettigan

glitter
EDITORIAL
The grown up guide to wearing glitter lips

If Tom Ford, Charlotte Tilbury, Chanel and Nars tell you...

By Holly O'Neill

books
EDITORIAL
8 brilliant books worth reading (that you may have missed)

 With so many brilliant books out in 2020, there’s every...

By Jennifer McShane

EDITORIAL
5 classic movies you must watch during the festive season

Jennifer McShane celebrates the classic films of her childhood that made...

By Jennifer McShane

Kearney
EDITORIAL
Siobhan Kearney murder: ‘People have suggested I move on. But I can’t. You cannot be expected to forget a life force’

“He strangled my sister. He tried to disguise it as...

By Amanda Cassidy

Aoibheann MacNamara
EDITORIAL
Inside a house conversion brimming with Scandi-Galwegian chic

Artistic dynamo Aoibheann MacNamara has loved every moment she’s spent...

By IMAGE Interiors & Living