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Image / Editorial

Festive Floral Inspiration


by Lauren Heskin
07th Dec 2015

The soft silverly leaves on Eucalyptus branches makes for a gorgeous centrepiece

The soft silverly leaves on Eucalyptus branches makes for a gorgeous centrepiece

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To have, and to hold…

One of the many seasonal advantages of a winter wedding is the variety of beautifully rustic festive flora at your ??? excuse us, your florist’s – fingertips. Create a multi-sensory wonderland for your wedding with an infusion of pine and rosemary and arrangements of cranberries and mistletoe, offering a visual feast that doesn’t make you feel gluttonous.

Seasonal Flowers

If you’re planning your wedding during those dark winter months there might not be a great choice of flowers. However just because it’s dull and dreary outside doesn’t mean your flowers have to be or that you need to pay a fortune to have them flown from across the world. Go for winter iris, paperwhites, amaryllis, hydrangrea, hellebores and anemones to great colour and texture. However if you wish to avoid making your wedding rsemble Santa’s workshop then go for neutral colours of greens, browns and cream. There are plenty of evergreens out there and add moss, ferns, eucalyptus and knarly hazel tree branches for an earthy, natural vibe.

 

The Centerpiece

centrepiece
Take inspiration from a winter woodland and create your own rustic centerpieces. Explore your local walking trail to gather twigs, leaves and handfuls of the other seasonal treats waiting to be foraged. By bringing nature to the table you can create a feeling of banqueting outdoors, with the comfort and warmth of being surrounded by the ones you love, in a rustic venue to compliment your blooms.

The Bouquet

bouquets
A seasonal posey of winter florals will last longer than one in summer (or indeed hothoused summer flowers, in winter). These hardy little blooms grow to withstand frost and harsh winds, so embrace the likes of the Star of Bethlehem, the Christmas Rose and even some berries and you should get the new year out of your wedding blooms.

 

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