Co-owner of Brickyard Simon Moore on his life in food
Co-owner of Brickyard Simon Moore on his life in food

Sarah Gill

Women in Sport: Irish professional footballer Abbie Larkin
Women in Sport: Irish professional footballer Abbie Larkin

Sarah Gill

Josh O’Connor’s new movie and Zoë Rocha’s Netflix series – what to watch this week
Josh O’Connor’s new movie and Zoë Rocha’s Netflix series – what to watch this week

Sarah Finnan

How to navigate your friendships when your priorities change
How to navigate your friendships when your priorities change

Niamh Ennis

With a swimming pool, wine cellar, gym and sea views, this Killiney home is on sale for €5.95 million
With a swimming pool, wine cellar, gym and sea views, this Killiney home is on...

Megan Burns

Irish stylist and creative director Katie-Ruby Robinson on her vintage favourites
Irish stylist and creative director Katie-Ruby Robinson on her vintage favourites

Sarah Gill

This 10 minute exercise reduces daily stress, says Dr Clodagh Campbell
This 10 minute exercise reduces daily stress, says Dr Clodagh Campbell

Shayna Sappington

Supper Club: 4 tasty salads to add to your weekly rotation
Supper Club: 4 tasty salads to add to your weekly rotation

IMAGE

Is rejection mindset, aka ‘but what if it could be better?’ ruining online dating?
Is rejection mindset, aka ‘but what if it could be better?’ ruining online dating?

Hannah Kingston

Jennie McGinn: A week in my wardrobe
Jennie McGinn: A week in my wardrobe

Sarah Finnan

Image / Editorial

The best way to follow Santa’s journey this Christmas Eve


By Amanda Cassidy
22nd Dec 2019
The best way to follow Santa’s journey this Christmas Eve

As children, we’d have to look to the sky to catch a glimpse of an unusually bright light or flashing celestial sleigh. But thanks to modern technology, children can follow Santa’s journey using some pretty neat trackers. 


NORAD is the best place to calculate what time you can expect an appearance down your chimney on Santa’s busiest night of the year.

It all started in 1955 when a child accidentally dialed NORAD to ask about Santa Claus, and they’ve been on Santa duty ever since. The Director of Operations at the time, Colonel Harry Shoup, had his staff check the radar for indications of Santa making his way south from the North Pole. Children who called were given updates on his location, and a tradition was born.

The North American Aerospace Defense Command provides details even down to how quickly the big man can travel. According to the data released this year, Santa will be traveling 510,000,000km after he takes to the skies with Rudolf et al.

This works out about 1,800km per second. No wonder he has to have his skates on, he needs to visit about 390,000 homes per minute – that’s 6,424 every second.

And to sustain the man in the red suit, children all over the planet are expected to leave out Christmas cake, Guinness, chocolate milk, cookies, pudding and gingerbread men. In fact, according to the numbers, Santa will consume a whopping 71, 744,000,000 calories. Just a few less than mummy will inhale through cheese over the holidays.

The route

According to NORAD, Father Christmas aka Old Saint Nick aka The big man aka Santa Claus likes to start his night off in the South Pacific with the Republic of Kiribati first on his stop-0ff list.

Then he travels west, delivering the gifts to New Zealanders, Australians and then the Japanese children. Without as much as a cup of tea (unless you’ve left one out) Santa then continues to Asia, Africa and Western Europe. Canada, the US, Mexico and South American end his night of work

Festivities

 The NORAD Santa website receives about nine million unique visitors keen to follow Santa’s journey. The official Santa Tracker will launch on Christmas Eve allowing parents and Children to track his journey across the globe as he delivers presents to all on the good list.

Almost 2 thousand people volunteer to answer emails and take phone calls about Santa’s exact position during the night. For those who can’t wait to wait than long, there are games, videos and stories in a range on languages on the site currently. On Christmas Eve, you can even call or text 1-877-HI-NORAD to get Santa’s exact location.

You can start your monitoring here.

If you want to keep fictional tabs on the interdimensional bearded one through other apps, you can try Kringle radio. Kringle Radio broadcasts directly from the North Pole all year round. It is a US-based, commercial-free and HD quality radio featuring a unique blend of Christmas music from nearly every available genre.

Call me

You can even have a personalised call with Santa in the Call to Santa App in the lead up to Christmas.

The North Pole Command Center makes sure Santa knows your child’s name and whether they’re on the naughty or nice list. On Christmas Eve, the app will allow you to explore a 3D globe where you can zoom in and out on Santa’s location.

It’ll also show the percentage of presents that Santa has delivered.

But remember that sometimes the magic is in the mystery and bombarding your child with so many apps can take some of the excitement out of things.

And as organised as we all are, don’t forget to look to the sky yourself on Christmas eve and remember there is a little bit of magic out there for all of us. You don’t always have to see it to believe it.

Merry Christmas…

Image via Unsplash.com 

Read more: Finding the balance between the magic and the manic this Christmas

Read more: All I want for Christmas – is a heart machine for tiny baby hearts

Read more: Why we are valuing experiences over presents this year