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IMAGE

Image / Editorial

5 top tips for managing hot flushes


by IMAGE
19th Oct 2020
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The Marion Gluck Clinic’s top tips for feeling cooler, to help any women struggling with hot flushes due to the menopause.


  1. Always Be Prepared

If you are out and about and know that you are likely to experience hot flushes, pop a small handheld fan in your handbag or car. Whilst this might not get rid of this particular menopause symptom, it will help to relieve the heat and cool you down enough to go about your daily routine.

  1. Concentrate on Your Breathing

One study, published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, found that two separate periods every day of controlled breathing helped to reduce hot flushes by 50%. Controlled breathing is a method that involves breathing in deeply for a count of five and then exhaling for a count of five. Breathing techniques can be a great stress reliever which also has an impact on other hormonal factors.

  1. Exercise Your Way To A Cooler Day

Whilst it might seem like the last thing you want to do when you’re suffering with hot flushes, exercise has been shown to help. A study conducted by Liverpool John Moores University found a 64% decrease in the number of hot flushes in women from the study who exercised between 30 and 45 minutes, three times per week. Exercise isn’t only good as a way to manage hot flushes, it also helps release endorphins to boost your mood, improves cardiac health and helps with weight loss, all of which can be affected by menopause.

  1. Get Acupuncture To Manage Hot Flushes

According to the British Acupuncture Council, acupuncture may be an effective way to manage hot flushes and other symptoms of menopause. According to their research acupuncture can help regulate FSH (Follicle Stimulating Hormone) which plays a key role in your monthly cycle; can increase relaxation and reduce tension, and stimulate nerves in your muscles which can lead to the release of endorphins.

  1. BHRT For Menopause Symptoms

Bio-identical Hormone Replacement Therapy is the treatment method by which a doctor can balance your hormone levels using hormones which are identical to your own. Following extensive consultation and evaluation by your doctor, they can prescribe you the appropriate hormonal treatments to help alleviate many of your menopause symptoms, including hot flushes. The Marion Gluck Clinic offer BHRT to help menopausal women to reduce their symptoms.

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