Chrissy Teigen says Meghan Markle reached out to her after her pregnancy loss
Chrissy Teigen says Meghan Markle reached out to her after her pregnancy loss

Megan Burns

8 brilliant Irish picks worth watching ahead of the Oscars this weekend
8 brilliant Irish picks worth watching ahead of the Oscars this weekend

Jennifer McShane

#EarthDay: 4 ways to recycle used coffee grounds for around the house
#EarthDay: 4 ways to recycle used coffee grounds for around the house

Shayna Sappington

Win a Paint at Home Kit for you and 4 friends
Win a Paint at Home Kit for you and 4 friends

IMAGE

Trouble nodding off? This viral sleeping hack says it can happen in 120 seconds
Trouble nodding off? This viral sleeping hack says it can happen in 120 seconds

Jennifer McShane

‘A natural extension’: We need Selma Blair’s positivity when talking about mobility
‘A natural extension’: We need Selma Blair’s positivity when talking about mobility

Jennifer McShane

This Rathgar home with an enormous conservatory is on the market for €2.65 million
This Rathgar home with an enormous conservatory is on the market for €2.65 million

Megan Burns

Image / Agenda / Breaking Stories

Vaccine war: What row is going on between the UK and the EU?

Both the UK and the EU are engaging in an increasingly fraught stand-off over vaccine supplies. Here's what we know.


by Jennifer McShane
22nd Mar 2021
blank

 

The British media has said that a ‘vaccine war’ may play out, thanks to the ongoing dispute between Anglo-Swedish pharma company AstraZeneca and the EU over the multinational’s supply of the Oxford/AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine. The European Union’s delivery of COVID vaccines has been far slower than the rollout in the UK, where more than 26 million adults have now had their first dose.

The Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, which is cheaper and easier to store than the other two approved vaccines, is seen as critical to ending the pandemic.

On Saturday, EU Commission President Ursula von der Leyen threatened to halt exports of AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccines if the bloc did not receive its promised deliveries first, escalating a row that has fanned an already tense relationship since Brexit.

“Underproduced and underdelivered”

With the EU facing a third wave of the coronavirus pandemic and less than a tenth of its population vaccinated, the European Commission president accused AstraZeneca – which helped develop the Oxford University vaccine – of having “underproduced and underdelivered” to the bloc. She warned she was “ready to use whatever tool we need” to ensure “Europe gets its fair share”.

The European Commission, which has coordinated the order of vaccines for all 27 EU countries, said it had exported some 35 million doses since the end of January, including 10 million to Britain, but Britain had exported none, despite two UK facilities featuring in the EU contract with AstraZeneca.

In response, Downing Street said they were fulling their contractual agreements and they expected the EU to do the same.  “There should not be restrictions on the export of vaccines by companies where they are fulfilling, contractual, responsive committees,” they said.

“The supply of vaccines from EU production facilities to the UK is indeed fulfilling contractual responsibilities.”

Critics of der Leyen’s comments have asked why the Commission was effectively sparking a “vaccine war with the UK” over exports of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, given that a large number of doses are lying unused in some member states due to fears over side-effects.

On our shores, Micheál Martin has warned that any European Union restrictions on vaccine exports would be a “retrograde step” that could undermine the supply of raw materials for vaccine production.

He told RTE radio that representatives of vaccine-maker Moderna had expressed concern to him that EU export restrictions on vaccines might impact its supply of raw materials for vaccine production.

So far, more than than 10% of the population here has received at least their first dose of a Covid jab, but experts have warned it could be September to November before the widespread vaccination programme was completed because of vaccine supply issues.

 

Also Read

Meghan Markle birth cert
BREAKING STORIES
Meghan Markle’s name was removed from her son’s birth certificate, but not at her request

If you think it's weird that the Duke and Duchess of Sussex would remove her name from her son's birt cert, Harry and Meghan would agree.

By Lauren Heskin

blank
AGENDA, LIVING
Are Buckingham Palace trying to smear Meghan Markle?

By Jennifer McShane

period poverty
BREAKING STORIES
Lidl Ireland to provide free sanitary products in effort to combat period poverty

By Sarah Finnan

BleedinJustice
BREAKING STORIES, HEALTH & WELLNESS
#BleedinJustice: One woman’s fight to make free period products freely available in Ireland

Senator Rebecca Moynihan on women's health in Ireland, the BleedinJustice campaign and the importance of public consultation.

By Lucy White

While the world has been singing the praises of New Zealand prime minister Jacinda Arden for supposedly forging a path in women’s health care with a legislation that is expected to be put into law in a the coming weeks, the recognition for other countries that have had similar measures already put in place has gone unnoticed.
premium IMAGE WRITES, BREAKING STORIES
Filomena Kaguako: New Zealand is not the first country to introduce paid miscarriage leave, so why the huge reaction?

India grants 6 weeks of fully paid leave for people who experience miscarriage, in the Philippines you are entitled to 60 days of fully paid leave. So why, asks Filomena Kaguako, are we so focused on New Zealand's introduction of three days of paid leave?

By Filomena Kaguako

to-do list
BUSINESS
To-do list stressing you out? Doing this simple task will improve your productivity at work

Being truly productive during the working day has little to...

By Jennifer McShane

Five women of different nationalities and cultures standing together.
premium IMAGE WRITES, REAL-LIFE STORIES
Lynn Enright: ‘Still, too much of the media is dominated by an agenda set by men’

When we were 13, my best friend and I used to pool our pocket money each month so we could afford to buy glossy women’s magazines...

By Lynn Enright