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Image / Beauty

Ask The Expert: Is micellar water any better than make-up wipes?


by Holly O'Neill
08th Jan 2019
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When easy, quick-fix and convenient beauty products sound too good to be true, it’s usually because they are…


Dry shampoo and make-up wipes are known quick-fix solutions that can cause long-term problems to your skin, but can cult-favourite micellar water be equally destructive? I mean, it’s got the word water in it. It can’t be too bad.

If you don’t know skincare expert Jennifer Rock, The Skin Nerd, she is the creator of the award-winning Cleanse Off Mitt. She’s an independent skincare expert, she’s lectured worldwide and has her own business, theskinnerd.com for convenient online consultations. And if that wasn’t enough she was the winner of IMAGE’s competition to find Ireland’s leading female self-starter, The Pitch.

When I heard her say she thought micellar water wasn’t much better than make-up wipes, I picked my jaw up off the floor and then asked her more.

So where did micellar water come from?
According to Jennifer, micellar water has been around for 100 years,’dating back to 1918 when the water shortage in France was rampant. “Eau Micellaire as the French call it”, she told us, ” is a cleansing product which removes the need for a sink or water. This means the skin is not rinsed after and it is for this reason that campers, jet-setters and makeup artists adore it. All that is required is the product and cotton wool.”

What’s it made of?

“Micellar water is comprised of micelles, which are tiny balls of cleaning oil molecules. These micelles are attracted to debris and oil thus acting as a magnet to remove the residue from the pore.”

Is it truly terrible for your skin?

“The majority of micellar waters that I am aware of are predominantly alcohol-based, meaning that they strip the skin of its natural bacteria. They are not a core concept, instead they are a Mickey Mouse version of skincare; it’s a cheat night, a quick fix that merely moves and smears makeup around the face.”

Can we trust any micellar waters?

“There are some brands which are suited as a pre-cleanser, for example, Bioderma, Nuxe and Yon-Ka as they are alcohol-free, full of antioxidants and infused with other ingredients.”

Your final verdict?

“It is an on-the-go option for cleansing but not to be used alone.”

OUR HERO PRODUCT:

Bioderma Sensibio H20 500ml Limited Edition Pump Bottle €16.50

A bottle of this magical elixir is sold around the world Every. Two. Seconds. From September, you’ll be able to buy a limited edition version with an easy to use pump bottle top. Sensibio H2O was the first dermatological micellar water. It’s an ultra-mild cleansing formula, guaranteeing excellent tolerance, safety of use (pH – 5) and exceptional cleansing properties for face and eyes. It’s suitable for very sensitive skin and contains soothing and decongesting active ingredients designed to eliminate impurities without drawing out moisture from the skin. The irritation often caused by cleansing is minimised, and skin feels comfortable and clean, never tight or dry.

 

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