The dark world of mommy vlogging takes another blow
The dark world of mommy vlogging takes another blow

Holly O'Neill

This Georgian Leopardstown home full of country charm is on sale for €2.7 million
This Georgian Leopardstown home full of country charm is on sale for €2.7 million

Megan Burns

The treatment of the women’s rugby Interpros is sadly indicative of all women’s sports in Ireland
The treatment of the women’s rugby Interpros is sadly indicative of all women’s sports in...

Lauren Heskin

These luxurious modular homes are anything but basic
These luxurious modular homes are anything but basic

IMAGE Interiors & Living

My life as a fashion buyer –the glamour and the grit
My life as a fashion buyer –the glamour and the grit

Abbi Gilbourne

‘The life we are living may not be the one we want’: Meet the career women pivoting because of the pandemic
‘The life we are living may not be the one we want’: Meet the career...

Dearbhail McDonald

Elsa Hosk poses nude with daughter, internet blows up
Elsa Hosk poses nude with daughter, internet blows up

Sarah Finnan

Ikea’s autumn/winter collection has arrived, here are our favourite picks
Ikea’s autumn/winter collection has arrived, here are our favourite picks

Megan Burns

Garth Brooks: No, we are not doing this again
Garth Brooks: No, we are not doing this again

Sarah Finnan

Culture Night is tomorrow, here are some of the events you can still attend
Culture Night is tomorrow, here are some of the events you can still attend

Megan Burns

Image / Editorial

It’s time to start recognising female leaders boost profits and engage employees


by Colette Sexton
12th Apr 2018
blank

Successful women don’t like to see other women succeed, isn’t that the belief that society hammers into us repeatedly? Women are mean bosses, they hold other women back, they pull up the ladder behind them, or at least that’s what we are told. But that is not my experience, and according to research, it is not true.

Employees who work for a female manager are actually more engaged, on average, than those who work for a male manager, according to research from consulting company Gallup. Employees who work for a female manager are 1.26 times more likely to strongly agree that “there is someone at work who encourages my development” compared to those who work for a male manager, Gallup found in 2015.

Closer to home, Bank of Ireland recently appointed Francesca McDonagh as chief executive. She is the first female leader of an Irish bank and this week Bank of Ireland took a massive step towards gender parity. Bank of Ireland has a 55:45 female-to-male ratio among its staff. However, its management and leadership teams are just 36 per cent female. Now the bank has committed to a 50/50 gender ratio in all new management and leadership appointments by the end of 2021. 2021 is soon! It is not some far away distant target that the bank will never be held accountable to. 

At the launch of the bank’s Responsible Business report on Monday, Francesca McDonagh said: “If we want to achieve our purpose, which is to enable customers, colleagues and communities to thrive, then we must reflect the diversity of the customers we serve,” she said. “As an organisation advocating for better gender balance in business we have set ourselves a goal of achieving an equal gender ratio.”

This is a clear example of a successful woman supporting other women. Some people, including women, baulk at the thoughts of gender quotas or gender ratios. They claim that they do not want to be promoted just because of their gender. What a lovely idea, until you realise that men, particularly white men, have gotten ahead in the world for centuries because of their gender.

Sitting around hoping the world will even out its gender inequality by itself is foolish – and it is bad for business. Female leaders boost profits – companies with 30 per cent female leadership can expect to add up to six percentage points to their net profit margin when compared with a similar business with no female leaders, according to a study of over 21,000 public companies in 91 countries by the Peterson Institute and EY last year. The benefits to more female leaders are clear.

We need to stop talking female leaders down and start holding them up as change-makers in the current male-dominated world. Francesca McDonagh is only in the job six months and is already introducing positive change. There are hundreds of other female leaders out there that will do the same. It is time to start cheering them on.

Also Read

Full House, onscreen father Danny Tanner
EDITORIAL
We’re remembering our favourite onscreen dads for Father’s Day

With Father’s Day just around the corner (this Sunday 20h June, so yes, you do have time to buy yours...

By Grace McGettigan

toxic
EDITORIAL
How to let go of toxic people, and the signs to recognise

By Niamh Ennis

blank
CULTURE
Reality Bites: TV shows like Love Island are warping our minds

It may be the most unifying show on television, but shows like Love Island are promoting some pretty damaging messages....

By Amanda Cassidy

brain
EDITORIAL
8 easy ways to keep your brain healthy that you can do right now

Your brain health is just as important as that of the rest of your body, says psychologist and neuroscientist Dr...

By IMAGE

blank
premium EDITORIAL
EVENT: How To Master the Art of Negotiation

We sit down with Negotiation Strategist Natalie Reynolds, discussing key tactics and strategies used to master the art of negotiation...

By Shayna Sappington

alternative asthma treatments
EDITORIAL
Three alternative asthma treatments to try this hayfever season

Approximately 80% of people with asthma also suffer from hayfever, which can make summer days a nightmare. These three alternative...

By Grace McGettigan

blank
AGENDA, EDITORIAL
When speaking about ageing, we should follow Julianne Moore’s lead

Actress Julianne Moore is tired of all the cliched tropes about female ageing. The way we speak about it; the...

By Jennifer McShane