A shared gold medal and an Olympic knitter: The most heartwarming moments from the Olympics so far
A shared gold medal and an Olympic knitter: The most heartwarming moments from the Olympics...

Sarah Finnan

Sustainable Irish sleepwear brands to help you catch some zs
Sustainable Irish sleepwear brands to help you catch some zs

Sarah Finnan

Andrew McGinley: ‘I cannot forgive the act of murder. I can’t forgive how my children died’
Andrew McGinley: ‘I cannot forgive the act of murder. I can’t forgive how my children...

Amanda Cassidy

What actually consitutes self-care when you’re a mother
What actually consitutes self-care when you’re a mother

Sophie White

The expert guide to your hair problems, from thinning hair to heat damage
The expert guide to your hair problems, from thinning hair to heat damage

Melanie Morris

Best hotel restaurants: 16 places to add to your Irish staycation bucket list
Best hotel restaurants: 16 places to add to your Irish staycation bucket list

Sarah Finnan

Here’s how you can manage symptoms of work anxiety
Here’s how you can manage symptoms of work anxiety

Jennifer McShane

Step straight onto the sand with these 5 Irish hotels on the beach
Step straight onto the sand with these 5 Irish hotels on the beach

Megan Burns

5 inspiring self-help books that will change your life
5 inspiring self-help books that will change your life

Jennifer McShane

Jamie Lee Curtis shows every parent how to handle their child transitioning
Jamie Lee Curtis shows every parent how to handle their child transitioning

Jennifer McShane

Image / Editorial

Study Says Long Working Hours Do Not Affect Your Relationship


by Jennifer McShane
12th Jan 2016
blank

Those who put their romantic strain down to seemingly endless work commitments may be forced to rethink this if a new study is to be believed. Turning conventional wisdom on its head, research has found that there are surprisingly few?negative associations between long working hours and happy relationships.

The study looked at 285 dual-career couples over the course of six months, and found that couples who both worked longer hours actually tended to spend as much time with their partner as they could, as opposed to a lot less, to make up for that lost time spent in order to try to create a sense of balance.

It also said that those who do devote long hours to their work are all too aware of the trade-off they’re making with their personal life and are conscious that they can’t have everything in life, but they, at least, try to use their remaining energies on connecting with their partners. The authors also found that couples who don’t have as much time to spend together due to careers may end up closer as they tend to participate in more shared activities as a way to utilise their time together.

“Our research questions the assumption that working longer hours is hazardous for all romantic relationships,” said the study authors.

Noting there wasn’t a massive amount of participants in this study, this obviously doesn’t mean that all relationships won’t be affected if couples are working every hour under the sun; it depends on the individual pairing, and how they deal with the issue, should it arise. There are many downsides to being over-worked, as we all know – studies also show that there is, in fact, little to suggest that those who put in more hours achieve more than their peers?- though this will always be subjective. It is better for your physical and mental wellbeing to have an even work/life balance though this, unfortunately, isn’t always possible. So the research does present something positive for the workaholics among us, who?perhaps contrary to popular belief, try equally hard to maintain relationships.

?Our results show that it’s not so much the time you spend at work that matters for your relationship, but how you spend the remaining time with your partner,? the study’s lead author, Dana Unger, Ph.D., explained. ?But this doesn’t always mean you have to think big; watching your favourite TV shows or having dinner together on a regular basis can be just as important.?

In other words, if you really want to make something work – be it a relationship or?binge-watching Making A Murderer – ?you will be able to find the time, regardless of what else you have going on in your life.

The study can be viewed here

Also Read

Full House, onscreen father Danny Tanner
EDITORIAL
We’re remembering our favourite onscreen dads for Father’s Day

With Father’s Day just around the corner (this Sunday 20h June, so yes, you do have time to buy yours...

By Grace McGettigan

blank
RELATIONSHIPS
The psychology of nostalgia and why we can’t get enough of it at the moment

There’s a reason we love being reminded of things that happened in our past. Amanda Cassidy explores why our trips...

By Amanda Cassidy

blank
EDITORIAL
‘In a public health emergency, why does so much of the post-pandemic talk revolve around drinking?’

No other European country is having the same public order challenges our capital city is experiencing, writes Amanda Cassidy I...

By Amanda Cassidy

blank
EDITORIAL
‘Quite interesting’: Princess Anne comments on The Crown

We’ve all heard that the royal family don’t exactly gather round to watch The Crown, but one member has shared...

By Jennifer McShane

alternative asthma treatments
EDITORIAL
Three alternative asthma treatments to try this hayfever season

Approximately 80% of people with asthma also suffer from hayfever, which can make summer days a nightmare. These three alternative...

By Grace McGettigan

blank
EDITORIAL
Nutritionist Daniel Davey’s harissa squash with giant couscous

This is a perfect lunch recipe, and the harissa does an incredible job of bringing the squash and chicken to...

By Meg Walker

stress
EDITORIAL
Are you up the walls? How the language of stress causes stress

Do you find yourself talking about how busy and stressed you are? With stress, the words we speak are like...

By Sophie White