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WATCH: 15 children from around the world share moving poems about life in lockdown


By Shayna Sappington
11th Jun 2020

Lincoln, 11, is from Sheffield in England. He lives with his mum, Kerry, and younger sister, Isha. They have enjoyed spending so much time together but have missed seeing their family and friends. Lincoln and his sister have been doing video calls with their dad and other people they miss. “It’s just going to be better when this is all over and we go back to our normal lives,” says Lincoln. Lincoln really likes maths and science. He’s also fascinated by animals and wants to be a vet or a marine biologist when he’s older. “What I find difficult about lockdown is adapting to all the new changes – with school and [not] seeing my friends,” says Lincoln, “also we can’t hug people”. The family have been going for walks, and one of Lincoln’s favourite memories of lockdown was seeing a pheasant, which come unusually close. Isha and her friend both set up their dolls and play together for hours over video call. Lincoln, Isha and Kerry have been involved in various school and community initiatives, supported by Save the Children, which strengthen links between families, teachers, other professionals and community groups. Kerry says the children’s school has been at the heart of the community response to Coronavirus – providing home-lessons, food parcels and checking up on families to see if they’re okay. Save the Children invited children across the world to write a poem about life under lockdown, sharing their hopes, fears and how the pandemic has changed their lives. Billions of children’s lives have been turned upside by the Coronavirus pandemic. Never before have so many children been forced out of school, millions could be pushed into extreme poverty and face potentially lasting psychological trauma. Lincoln’s poem: Life was always fast-paced, we never slowed down, Until everything stopped when Corona came to town. Now all is quiet and there’s peace all around, We’ve looked in our hearts and kindness we

WATCH: 15 children from around the world share moving poems about life in lockdown

Save the Children asked 15 children from 15 different countries to share their experience about life in lockdown and the results are heartwarming


When lockdown measures were suddenly put in place, children everywhere had their life turned upside down.

Schools were closed, playdates prohibited and the routine that many kids rely on was gone.

Yet many little ones have remained positive, focusing on the fun things they can do when lockdown ends and the world begins to return to normal.

Children’s charity Save the Children asked 15 kids from 15 different countries to express their lockdown experience through poetry, sharing their hopes and fears.

A global perspective

From places like the United States, Italy, Peru, Colombia, Gaza, Yemen, South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, these children use their poems to bring to life the experiences of living through this pandemic.

14-year-old Maya from Za’atari refugee camp in Jordan wrote:

“Where’s the school? Where are the classes?

 And my friends, and the teacher asking us about our homework.

Empty and sad streets.

And the playgrounds are as if they’re asking about us.

Corona, tomorrow you will see.

Our dreams, our awareness and our will, shall bring us victory over you.”

And Lincoln (age 11) from the UK said:

“When it is safe, I’ll hold my arms open wide,

and shout to the world we can all go outside! 

Don’t give up hope the end is in sight,

if we all stick together, we’ll all win this fight!”

United in hope

“These powerful poems show the enormous impact coronavirus has had on children’s lives, as well as their strength, resilience, and hopes for the future,” commented Yolande Wright, Save the Children’s Director of Inclusion.

“It is so important we listen to children directly during these unprecedented times—we are not all affected equally, and children can be particularly vulnerable.”

Despite all their differences, these children are facing the same struggles and they remain united in their amazing capacity for hope. 

Watch the full video below:

Feature image: savethechildren.org

 

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