GALLERY: 30 standout Oscars gowns over the years
GALLERY: 30 standout Oscars gowns over the years

Jennifer McShane

These gorgeous pots will zhuzh up even a slightly sad houseplant
These gorgeous pots will zhuzh up even a slightly sad houseplant

Megan Burns

This gorgeous redbrick home in Rathmines is on the market for €825,000
This gorgeous redbrick home in Rathmines is on the market for €825,000

Lauren Heskin

This bright Dublin 8 extension is a masterclass in adding life to a house
This bright Dublin 8 extension is a masterclass in adding life to a house

Megan Burns

10 Netflix picks worth a repeated watch
10 Netflix picks worth a repeated watch

Jennifer McShane

Why I can’t bring myself to post a make-up-free, filter-free selfie
Why I can’t bring myself to post a make-up-free, filter-free selfie

Aisling Keenan

5 clever hacks for a small kitchen
5 clever hacks for a small kitchen

Lauren Heskin

Image / Editorial

Research Discovers Why IVF Fails


by Jeanne Sutton
05th Feb 2015
blank

Research Discovers Why IVF Fails

IVF is a miracle of modern medicine that can bring long sought-after joy to couples who struggled to concieve. For many others it can exacerberate an already emotional situation. Not only is In Vitro Fertilization expensive, but it has only a 25% success rate. Participants need to bear this worrying statistic in mind before starting on the journey to potential parenthood. And then there are repeat cycles of IVF, a common occurrence that exert enormous psychological and biological stress on women.

However, a team of scientists at the University of Manchester have made a discovery that many in the fertility science space are heralding as a major breakthrough that may substantially increase the success rate of IVF.

The study in the Journal of Cell Science examined the moment a fertilised egg is implanted, the stage in the process that sees the majority of embryo losses. The embryo fails to attach to the endometrium, that’s the mucus membrane of the uterine wall.

Women who undergo these losses and fail to implant an embryo share molecular traits and have altered levels of microRNA-145 in their endometrium. Researchers played with the levels of the microRNA to see what would happen.

It turns out these microRNA molecules are inhibiting a protein, called IGF1R, that is supposed to grow in the endometrium during the optimium four-day window an embryro has to attach. This protein increases the likelihood of an egg implanting successfully, Professor John Aplin who led the study said, ?Our study suggests that the presence of IGF1R during this period is required for the embryo to stick to the uterus.?

There is already talk of developing a drug to inhibit the microRNA molecule, although more research is required. This is some seriously good news for couples who might be exploring IVF.

manchester.ac.uk

Follow Jeanne Sutton on Twitter @jeannedesutun

LOVE this? Why not have IMAGE delivered directly to your door each month? Check out this month’s offer here.

Also Read

Keith-_-Tara_130_Web Shantanu Starick painting kitchen cabinets
EDITORIAL
How to limit drips and brush strokes while painting kitchen cabinets

Painting kitchen cabinets can be transformative and can be achieved relatively low-cost,...

By Amanda Kavanagh

blank
EDITORIAL
Is marketplace feminism stealing the limelight from real female-driven issues?

‘Femertising’ is big business. Brands are increasingly taking advantage of...

By Amanda Cassidy

Rosanna Davidson and her twin boys
premium REAL-LIFE STORIES, PARENTHOOD
Rosanna Davidson: ‘I had sort of accepted that I was a girl who couldn’t have a baby herself’

For Mother's Day Lia Hynes sits down with Rosanna Davidson, whose exceptional journey into motherhood has given many hope.

By Lia Hynes

blank
EDITORIAL
Eclipsed: The powerful, all-female play exposing a Magdalene Laundry you need to see

‘Eclipsed’ director Kate Canning told Jennifer McShane of the challenges...

By Jennifer McShane

blank
EDITORIAL
Vaccine envy: ‘Why a year of Covid has brought out the begrudgers’

By Amanda Cassidy

blank
EDITORIAL
MHQ: ‘Before we put more countries on the list, we must know how they will be taken off’

By Amanda Cassidy

Women with MS who take medication, especially immunosuppressants, cannot become pregnant unless they come off medication.
premium HEALTH & WELLNESS, REAL-LIFE STORIES
I had to weigh up the possibility of losing my mind against losing my future children

Holograms of the children she may never have dance across Dearbhla Crosses' mind as an MS diagnosis and Covid-19 are unwelcome reminders of her biological clock ticking.

By Dearbhla Crosse