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Men and Women at Home: Who Does What?


By IMAGE
19th Mar 2015
Men and Women at Home: Who Does What?

 

A survey carried out by Stork has revealed that there is a massive divide between men and women when it comes to doing everyday household chores and especially when it comes to baking. The nationwide survey was commissioned as part of Stork’s Easter Baking Campaign which is aiming to get Irish people baking up a storm for their loved ones over the Easter period.

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When it comes to domestic chores, it was the traditional gender-linked household jobs which showed the biggest discrepancy between men and women. Most women said that they could bake (90% versus 60% of males), sew on a button (88% versus 54% of males) and knit (62% versus just 4% of males). Nothing groundbreaking there, although we were a little surprised by the fact over 50% of men could sew on a button.

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On the other hand, when it comes to changing a tyre, 84% of men were confident in their ability to do so as opposed to just 35% of women. The act of putting up shelves resulted in similar figures with 75% of males claiming they can figure out even the most detailed of IKEA instructions while only 33% of women felt the same.

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?Not cleaning up properly? (Yes) was the biggest gripe for 4 out of 10 Irish adults when asked what they disliked about their partners? habits in the kitchen. Meanwhile, 23% of men were also irked by their partners being back seat cooks (YES!) whilst 25% of women took issue with their partners not expressing enough gratitude when cooked for.

When asked about baking in more detail, 66% of Irish women scored themselves a 7/10 or above for their skills versus 44% of men.? In terms of their baking styles, 40% of Irish men describe themselves as ?loose, confident and a bit bish bash bosh? like Jamie Oliver, versus 27% of women.? 5 of 10 Irish people overall described their skill level as simple and homely – like Donal Skehan.

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Stork’s Ryan Perry said: ?People can feel pressure for their cooking or baking to turn out perfectly every time and this can contribute to a degree of kitchen anxiety and some minor tiffs.?

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What’s your biggest gripe when it comes to goings on in the kitchen with your partner?

@NiallMacSuain

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