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Gwyneth Paltrow Doesn’t Care If You Like Her Or Not


By Jennifer McShane
04th Jan 2017

attends Moet & Chandon Toasts To Paddle For Pink on August 1, 2015 in Bridgehampton, New York.

Gwyneth Paltrow Doesn’t Care If You Like Her Or Not

Whatever your opinion might be about Gwyneth Paltrow (and people have many opinions) her frequently bizarre lifestyle advice (steam cleaning our vaginas? Still never) and uncoupling ideas have a knack for sticking in the public subconscious. Some can’t help but be secretly fascinated by her Goop ideology (it is this that has resulted in Paltrow becoming the think piece target of our generation),?though she does have a knack when it comes to polarising her audience – well, not every woman will enjoy getting stung by bees – but yet, the actress-turned-entrepreneur has decided to embrace public opinion about her – something she said, she felt change for the worst once she hit her forties – by collectively not giving two hoots what people have to say about her.

Yes, Paltrow knows she’s weird, but as of now, no longer cares what you or I have to say on the matter.

?When I turned 40, I felt like I got this free software upgrade that I wasn’t expecting,? she told InStyle. ?It just happened. Suddenly I was like, ?Oh, this is fantastic: I don’t care! I like myself, and I’m just going to live my life, and I’m going to stop worrying and tearing myself down.??

Her critics, she says, are ageist. Once she hit her forties, she explained that’s when she noticed the shift; the barrage of negativity that came with everything she said or did and yet, she’s spoken out before about embracing her lines and wrinkles, calling them medals of honour and a sign of a life well lived. “I’d never want to go back and be 26,” Paltrow said last year.

Paltrow’s candidness has always been refreshing; she was never one to hold back on addressing her personal oddities – made public thanks to Goop – which we feel is mighty refreshing despite not agreeing with her approach to health and wellness all the time. It is, she explained something she’s going to keep pushing, regardless of how many take issue with it. ?”A friend told me if you’re a trailblazer, you’re the first one through, and you get the cuts because you’re hacking the path.”

Nothing says empowerment like giving your haters?the middle finger and being that it’s January and a time in which we’re ready to embrace change, perhaps we can take a leaf out of Paltrow’s attitude book. Embrace your weirdness, for it makes you unique and tune out the negativity.

?I’ve learned how the cycle works,? she continued. ?It used to be that I would talk about something or write about it, and people would be like, ?What the f**k is she talking about? She’s a witch!? And then, later on, it would sort of catch on.”

?So now I just recognise it: OK, I’m going to talk about this, and people will think it’s weird, and that’s how it goes.?