I tried the Shakti acupuncture mat for 2 weeks – here’s how it went
I tried the Shakti acupuncture mat for 2 weeks – here’s how it went

Grace McGettigan

Gaining weight for a part is good but wearing a ‘fat suit’ is bad? Unpacking the Emma Thompson backlash
Gaining weight for a part is good but wearing a ‘fat suit’ is bad? Unpacking...

Sarah Finnan

This surprisingly modern four-bed family home is on the market for €335,000
This surprisingly modern four-bed family home is on the market for €335,000

Sarah Finnan

Life Hacks: Three top TikTok tips to make your home smell incredible
Life Hacks: Three top TikTok tips to make your home smell incredible

Sarah Gill

This newly-renovated family home with lots of garden space is on the market for €312,500
This newly-renovated family home with lots of garden space is on the market for €312,500

Sarah Finnan

The Great Getaway: 9 things to put on your Belfast bucket list 
The Great Getaway: 9 things to put on your Belfast bucket list 

Sarah Finnan

How not to break up online: ‘My husband’s girlfriend trying to take the p**s out of me’
How not to break up online: ‘My husband’s girlfriend trying to take the p**s out...

Amanda Cassidy

Why we should all be swimming in the Irish seas this summer
Why we should all be swimming in the Irish seas this summer

Freya Drohan

‘Two decades as a vegetarian has left me ill-equipped to whip up a protein-rich meal for my baby’
‘Two decades as a vegetarian has left me ill-equipped to whip up a protein-rich meal...

Hannah-Louise Dunne

“It’s an old-fashioned attitude, wanting to be really thin” — Do Victoria Beckham’s comments on body image reflect modern mentality?
“It’s an old-fashioned attitude, wanting to be really thin” — Do Victoria Beckham’s comments on...

Sarah Gill

Image / Editorial

Can Early Screening Help Detect Postpartum Depression?


By IMAGE
23rd Mar 2016
Can Early Screening Help Detect Postpartum Depression?

A new study from Belgium just may help in our battle against postpartum depression, a mental health condition that can affect as many as one in five mothers after childbirth, and one that isn’t as widely discussed as it should be. By analysing the mood-related behaviours of women during their second and third trimesters, researchers were able to distinguish between those who would be more likely to become depressed after childbirth and those who would not. Now, more widespread studies are being conducted in America to help the women who experience this. By performing mental health screenings throughout the pregnancy and towards the end, before labour, those likely to suffer with PPD can get to treatment earlier, lessening the severity of it when they eventually come home from the hospital, newborn baby in tow. In our opinion, PPD is something that should certainly be addressed long before the baby is born, so that mothers are equipped with the necessary information and understanding of what’s happening, the tools and resources they need to come through it, rather than be hit with it, out of the blue, when there’s so many other changes at play. If women everywhere knew that a) it was a perfectly normal and incredibly common response to have and b) they would be able to come through it with the appropriate treatment, perhaps the fear and anxiety surrounding PPD would be significantly reduced.

According to Wreg.com, the United States Preventative Task Force recently recommended all women get screened, and that’s something we’d like to see standardised here in Ireland.

Speaking to Wreg, maternal mental health therapist Beth Shelton says: “We just expect that everything is going to be wonderful and perfect, and you’re going to love your baby and bring your baby home. It’s going to be delightful, and the rainbows and butterflies are going to run your house.”

Demonstrating that we need more resources worldwide to help women experiencing this, Shelton explains that “only about 15 percent of the women reach out for help. “There are other studies that say in areas higher poverty, and lower socioeconomic classes, the number can actually be one in four.” said Shelton.