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Image / Editorial

Bi-annual clock changes to be scrapped by 2021


by Jennifer McShane
04th Mar 2019
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Following a public consultation early last year asking people if they think we should scrap the twice-yearly practice of the clocks going back, it was announced today clocks jumping forward and backwards an hour each year will now end in 2021.

This is due to a new EU policy; The decision was taken by the European Parliament’s Transport and Tourism Committee after a report was backed by 23 votes to 11.

Related: Irish public asked for views on abolishing changes to clocks going back

Now the EU states, like Ireland, must now decide which time – summer or winter – they will stick to. It is up to individual member states to decide which time, winter or summer, they will adhere to throughout the year.

Clocks go forward this year on March 21.

According to reports, Ireland South MEP Deirdre Clune said that member states should notify the European Commission of their choice by April 2020.

A consultation conducted by the Commission last year found that over 80% of people favoured abolishing seasonal clock changes, according to Clune.

“At European level, Irish people took part in public consultation and Ireland voted overwhelmingly to stop the clock changes. There are many benefits to ending the process of changing the clocks each year such as improved outcomes for road safety and economic benefits. In addition, brighter evenings in winter would have a positive benefit for public health.”

Summertime arrangements in the EU require clocks to be changed twice per year to cater to the changing patterns of daylight and to take advantage of the available daylight in a given period.

Main photograph: Pexels

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