Here’s what you can snap up in Søstrene Grene stores right now
Here’s what you can snap up in Søstrene Grene stores right now

Megan Burns

Check out every shade of Glossier Ultralip, the new balm and lip tint hybrid
Check out every shade of Glossier Ultralip, the new balm and lip tint hybrid

Holly O'Neill

Hungry? This colourful sweet potato salad can be whipped up in a flash
Hungry? This colourful sweet potato salad can be whipped up in a flash

Meg Walker

‘She didn’t murder anybody’: Linda Martin weighs in on Nadine Coyle’s infamous Passportgate 20 years on
‘She didn’t murder anybody’: Linda Martin weighs in on Nadine Coyle’s infamous Passportgate 20 years...

Sarah Finnan

“When I used to dream of transitioning, I thought I’d wear short skirts and high heels”
“When I used to dream of transitioning, I thought I’d wear short skirts and high...

Sophie White

I scream, you scream: Global shortage of Cadbury flakes spells trouble for 99 ice creams
I scream, you scream: Global shortage of Cadbury flakes spells trouble for 99 ice creams

Sarah Finnan

Increased lawlessness among teens needs compassion, not admonishment
Increased lawlessness among teens needs compassion, not admonishment

Amanda Cassidy

Image / Editorial

Behold the Official Dublin Market Bag


by Michelle Hanley
30th Jul 2015
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The Apolis market bag by 31 Chapel Lane

We’re delighted to see this tote popping up all over our newsfeeds of late. Much more than?just a beautiful design, this bag is ethical, sustainable and practical?

Launched in 2009 by Apolis, Local + Global Market Bags are now found in 14 countries across the globe and nearly 150 cities??one of the latest being our very own big smoke, Dublin.

The manufacture of these bags creates consistent employment for a group of 21 female artisans in a rural Bangladesh sewing academy. Not only that, but a portion of the profits also goes to a community project in support of social and educational projects in Saidpur. To get an insight into the production, and see the women behind the bags, have a look at the clip below?

Made of 100?per cent?natural golden jute fibre, the bag?is lined in waterproof fabric, has a natural vegetable-dyed leather strap and is reinforced by antique nickel rivets.

Cavan-based fabric aficionados 31 Chapel Lane have teamed up with Apolis on the Local + Global project here in Ireland. Distribution of the bags is given to an artisan retailer from the host country, so you can give yourself a pat on the back for supporting your own community while also giving a fair price to the makers back in Bangladesh?? everyone’s happy!

BAGS

Another plus is that the bag?is environmentally friendly and reusable,?encouraging?people to support their local farmers’ markets and healthy eating too.?What’s not to like?

‘Dublin Ireland’ Market Bag, €68, 31 Chapel Lane

Love it? Buy the bag from 31 Chapel Lane?now.

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