‘When he went to bed, we’d fall apart in each other’s arms’
‘When he went to bed, we’d fall apart in each other’s arms’

Lia Hynes

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‘When he went to bed, we’d fall apart in each other’s arms’


by Lia Hynes
13th Sep 2021
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Yavanna and Lar Keogh talk to Liadan Hynes about their beloved son Oscar, coping with a terminal cancer diagnosis, the reality of grief, and the new charity they are launching with Melissa Rauch in his honour

When Yavanna and Lar Keogh received the devastating diagnosis that their beloved three and a half year old son Oscar had a rare, incurable form of brain cancer, they were told by their son’s doctors that he had somewhere between two months, and two years.  “We had two choices,” Lar, his father, a  primary school teacher, says now of finding out that Oscar had the rare brain tumour Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma in 2018.  “We...

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