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Image / Self / Advice / Health & Wellness / Real-life Stories
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SELF, STYLE

Black women still can’t find their favourite hair care products in Ireland, so they’re making them


by Angela O'Shaughnessy
18th Feb 2021

Denga and Masindi Phiringa, a pair of South African sisters currently studying law and psychiatric nursing, launched the skin and hair care brand, Whipped 2 Glow

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Denga and Masindi Phiringa, a pair of South African sisters currently studying law and psychiatric nursing, launched the skin and hair care brand, Whipped 2 Glow

A lack of hair care products for Black women in Ireland has led to some entrepreneurial women taking matters into their own hands. Angela O'Shaughnessy sits down with business owners Ekari Maele and Denga and Masindi Phiriga and hears advice from trichologist Victoria Elliot

Whenever I return to Ireland, the first thing I worry about is my hair. Where will I get my products? How many bottles and tubs of gel, curling cream, edge control and deep conditioner can I fit into my suitcase? Will I still have to order my hair staples from the UK or the US, or will Tesco and Boots finally carry what I need? Ethnic diversity is relatively new to Ireland and people of...

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