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Image / Editorial

This Ad Imagines A World Where Female Scientists Are Treated Like Celebrities


By Niamh ODonoghue
15th Feb 2017
This Ad Imagines A World Where Female Scientists Are Treated Like Celebrities

Imagine living in a?world where female scientists were treated the same as movie stars, models, socialites, and social media stars…


That’s what?American multinational corporation General electric (GE) is asking in their latest public campaign to encourage women to apply for scientific jobs. The video, which was published last week, imagines the first woman to win the National Medal of Science in Engineering?Millie Dresselhaus as the nation’s most sought-after’star. The heartwarming video shows excited children dressed up as their hero Millie (aka the?queen of carbon science), an abundance of babies named after her, crowds gathered to attend lectures, and even a Millie emoji (far better than Kimoji’s?in our opinion).

The ad is part of GE’s newest campaign to hire and train more women, and the company has’set?a goal of helping over 20,000 women?in STEM roles by 2020 and obtaining 50:50 representation for all our technical entry-level and development programs.

In a statement, GE said the video is a way to promote and highlight gender imbalance within the science and technology sectors, and that for GE, the future is most definitely female. “We know that a company that works to change the world, should reflect the world. That is how we will balance the equation”.

The ad’s description on their Youtube channel sums up their ethos perfectly: At GE, we’re not just imagining a world where brilliant women are the stars – we’re helping create it. Take a minute to watch the video below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQ6_fOX7ITQ