How to face the end of days when everything is overwhelmingly terrible
How to face the end of days when everything is overwhelmingly terrible

Jessie Collins

Here are our favourite dog-friendly hotels in Ireland for every budget
Here are our favourite dog-friendly hotels in Ireland for every budget

Megan Burns

A beginner’s guide to: Starlight kayaking on Ireland’s glow-in-the-dark lake
A beginner’s guide to: Starlight kayaking on Ireland’s glow-in-the-dark lake

Geraldine Carton

This house in Myrtleville, Co Cork with spectacular sea views is on the market for €850,000
This house in Myrtleville, Co Cork with spectacular sea views is on the market for...

Megan Burns

Does astrology affect our dreams and other things we’ve always wanted to know
Does astrology affect our dreams and other things we’ve always wanted to know

Sarah Finnan

Life-changing stories: ‘I went from being suicidal to becoming a Samaritans volunteer’
Life-changing stories: ‘I went from being suicidal to becoming a Samaritans volunteer’

Amanda Cassidy

8 engrossing Netflix picks worth starting this weekend
8 engrossing Netflix picks worth starting this weekend

Jennifer McShane

Meet the Irish sisters behind the interior selections at Cabü cabins in Cavan
Meet the Irish sisters behind the interior selections at Cabü cabins in Cavan

Amanda Kavanagh

The expert guide to embracing and growing out your grey hair
The expert guide to embracing and growing out your grey hair

Holly O'Neill

Beat the Sunday fear by treating your weekend like a holiday
Beat the Sunday fear by treating your weekend like a holiday

Colette Sexton

Image / Editorial

Prince Harry: “It Cannot Just Be Women Who Speak Up For Girls”


by IMAGE
24th Mar 2016

OKHARI, NEPAL - MARCH 22: Prince Harry takes part in a holi celebration at Gauda Secondary School on day four of his visit to Nepal on March 22, 2016 in Leorani, Nepal. Prince Harry is on a five day visit to Nepal, his first official tour of the country. (Photo by James Whatling - Pool/Getty Images)

blank

Prince Harry is a legend. He likes to party (who could forget), he’s comfortable with his naked body (who could forget), he’s always off on interesting missions to far-flung places and meeting with those less fortunate than him and he’s using his platform to address important issues and make a real difference in the world, among which gender equality is included. PRINCE HARRY FOR KING!

To achieve this, it cannot just be women who speak up for girls.

While on a recent trip to Nepal, where he was very warmly received, Harry gave a speech at the opening of the Nepal Girl Summit at Kathmandu. The more interesting of the princes joined Nepal’s first female president Bidya Devi Bhandari to speak out against child marriage and call for a more significant focus on girls’ education. Here’s some of the deadly things he said:

?I am delighted to have the opportunity of opening this event alongside President Bhandari. Madam President, you have championed the opportunities for women and girls in Nepal for many years and it is a privilege to share this stage with you today. Over the last decade, I have been hugely inspired by working alongside those striving to help young people achieve their full potential, sometimes in very difficult circumstances. My charity Sentebale has helped thousands of children access education and healthcare in Lesotho, Southern Africa.

Prince Harry Nepal visit day 4 Prince Harry visiting Gauda Secondary School, Okhari earthquake-damaged school, which is being reconstructed with assistance from the Gurkha Welfare Scheme. The Prince is given garlands and flowers and plays volley ball with local school children See story by Emily Andrews Picture by Paul Edwards .
Prince Harry Nepal visit day 4
Prince Harry visiting Gauda Secondary School, Okhari
earthquake-damaged school, which is being reconstructed with assistance from the Gurkha Welfare Scheme.
The Prince is given garlands and flowers and plays volley ball with local school children
See story by Emily Andrews
Picture by Paul Edwards .

Closer to home, in Nottingham, England, I have seen first-hand the transformational effect of even the smallest opportunity in keeping a child away from gangs, keeping them in school, and on track to a more fulfilling and prosperous life. While the unique challenges faced by girls is not a topic I have spoken much about in the past, I think it’s important to acknowledge something that has become obvious to me and is already known to everyone in this room: there are way too many obstacles between girls and the opportunities they deserve. Whether it’s a girl in Lesotho living with HIV; or the talented young woman in Britain who doesn’t get taken seriously because of where she grew up; or the 14 year old girl forced out of school so she can get married here in Nepal; we need to acknowledge that so many countries and cultures are failing to protect the opportunities of young women and girls in the way they do for boys.

I believe it is vitally important for men like me to acknowledge this as loudly and openly as role models do like President Bhandari, the US First Lady Michelle Obama and activists like Malala. As the First Lady has said, change needs to come from the bottom up. We won’t unlock these opportunities for young women and girls unless we can change the mind-set of every family and community. To achieve this, it cannot just be women who speak up for girls.

OKHARI, NEPAL - MARCH 22: Prince Harry is given garlands and flowers as he visits Gauda Secondary School, an earthquake-damaged school being reconstructed with assistance from the Gurkha Welfare Scheme, in the Himalayan village of Okhari on day four of his visit to Nepal on March 22, 2016 in Okhari, Nepal. Prince Harry is on a five day visit to Nepal, his first official tour of the country. (Photo by Paul Edwards - Pool/Getty Images)
OKHARI, NEPAL – MARCH 22: Prince Harry is given garlands and flowers as he visits Gauda Secondary School, an earthquake-damaged school being reconstructed with assistance from the Gurkha Welfare Scheme, in the Himalayan village of Okhari on day four of his visit to Nepal on March 22, 2016 in Okhari, Nepal. Prince Harry is on a five day visit to Nepal, his first official tour of the country. (Photo by Paul Edwards – Pool/Getty Images)

So let’s be open about some of the challenges facing young women.Globally, 62 million girls are not getting the education they deserve. Two thirds of the nearly 800 million people who were never taught to read and write are women. Around the world, more than 700 million women alive today were married as children and nearly 250 million of them were married before the age of 15. Here in Nepal, nearly half of all women who are today in their twenties, thirties and forties were married before their eighteenth birthdays. And a little under half gave birth while still in their teens. It may be obvious to say it, but girls who marry young stay at home. They don’t finish school. And they soon become locked in a cycle of illiteracy, poverty, ill health and, ultimately, powerlessness.

How can this cycle be broken? We all know what the answer is – education. Improved access to education can transform lives, families, communities and ultimately entire countries. When girls finish their schooling, they gain skills, knowledge and confidence – in short; they are empowered to improve their lives and the lives of everyone around them.”

HARRY WE LOVE YOU. Read the rest of his speech and other amazing things he got up to in Nepal here.

KATHMANDU, NEPAL - MARCH 23: Prince Harry meets young burns victim Biplov Puri, 4 at Kanti Children's Hospital on the final day of his tour of the country on March 23, 2016 in Kathmandu, Nepal. Established in 1963 the hospital has a capacity of 320 beds and treats children up to the age of 14. Many of it's patients have been injured whilst living in the hazardous environments of the camps following the earthquake. (Photo by Adam Gerrard - Pool/Getty Images)
KATHMANDU, NEPAL – MARCH 23: Prince Harry meets young burns victim Biplov Puri, 4 at Kanti Children’s Hospital on the final day of his tour of the country on March 23, 2016 in Kathmandu, Nepal. Established in 1963 the hospital has a capacity of 320 beds and treats children up to the age of 14. Many of it’s patients have been injured whilst living in the hazardous environments of the camps following the earthquake. (Photo by Adam Gerrard – Pool/Getty Images)

Also Read

blank
EDITORIAL
‘Totally allowed but totally shouldn’t: Welcome to the Great Irish Pandemic Paradox’

In a time when cool heads are needed – it’s more than the current heatwave that’s melting minds, writes Amanda...

By Amanda Cassidy

blank
AGENDA, EDITORIAL
When speaking about ageing, we should follow Julianne Moore’s lead

Actress Julianne Moore is tired of all the cliched tropes about female ageing. The way we speak about it; the...

By Jennifer McShane

blank
premium EDITORIAL
EVENT: How To Master the Art of Negotiation

We sit down with Negotiation Strategist Natalie Reynolds, discussing key tactics and strategies used to master the art of negotiation...

By Shayna Sappington

blank
AGENDA, EDITORIAL
No, the Olympics haven’t given athletes ‘anti-sex’ cardboard beds

Despite some media coverage, the beds are actually focused on sustainability as opposed to intimacy restrictions. Recently, distance runner Paul...

By Jennifer McShane

blank
premium EDITORIAL
Join The Club to Avail of Your Complimentary Tickets to The IMAGE Business Summit 2021

Don’t miss this year’s IMAGE Business Summit, with an expert line-up, skills masterclasses, keynote addresses and more.Back by popular demand,...

By Shayna Sappington

brain
EDITORIAL
8 easy ways to keep your brain healthy that you can do right now

Your brain health is just as important as that of the rest of your body, says psychologist and neuroscientist Dr...

By IMAGE

toxic
EDITORIAL
How to let go of toxic people, and the signs to recognise

By Niamh Ennis