Chrissy Teigen says Meghan Markle reached out to her after her pregnancy loss
Chrissy Teigen says Meghan Markle reached out to her after her pregnancy loss

Megan Burns

8 brilliant Irish picks worth watching ahead of the Oscars this weekend
8 brilliant Irish picks worth watching ahead of the Oscars this weekend

Jennifer McShane

#EarthDay: 4 ways to recycle used coffee grounds for around the house
#EarthDay: 4 ways to recycle used coffee grounds for around the house

Shayna Sappington

Win a Paint at Home Kit for you and 4 friends
Win a Paint at Home Kit for you and 4 friends

IMAGE

Trouble nodding off? This viral sleeping hack says it can happen in 120 seconds
Trouble nodding off? This viral sleeping hack says it can happen in 120 seconds

Jennifer McShane

‘A natural extension’: We need Selma Blair’s positivity when talking about mobility
‘A natural extension’: We need Selma Blair’s positivity when talking about mobility

Jennifer McShane

This Rathgar home with an enormous conservatory is on the market for €2.65 million
This Rathgar home with an enormous conservatory is on the market for €2.65 million

Megan Burns

Image / Editorial

Six tips for preventing weight gain during the menopause


by IMAGE
14th Jul 2018
blank

Most women gain weight as they age, but excess pounds aren’t inevitable. Paula Mee reveals how you can minimise menopause weight gain in this month’s issue of IMAGE magazine.

Don’t sweat the small stuff

Keep your stress hormones at bay. Relax and find some serenity in your day. There are great apps to support you while you meditate. If you don’t like the sound of meditation, get out of your busy head another way.

Some people journal or write “morning papers” on awakening – just three pages daily of whatever it is they are thinking about when they put pen to paper. It’s a stream of consciousness and helps to release thoughts and let them go. Others do yoga, listen to soothing music or enjoy long walks in nature or the garden. Whatever brings you a sense of calm, do it.

Check in with your hunger

Get your head – not your mouth – into the driver’s seat. It’s tempting to deal with frustration, lethargy, stress and even boredom with food or alcohol. Emotional eating and drinking might give us instant gratification, but bingeing only leads to guilt and bad habits. Find a better way of dealing with emotional pain and needs.

The three Ps

Pilates, plank and posture will help tighten your core and improve your shape. Any strength training will boost your muscle mass and consequently your metabolism. The higher your muscle to fat ratio, the better your metabolism. You can use your own bodyweight in TRX, push-ups, kettlebells, or resistance bands. Yoga can also shape your core as long as your technique is good. A few sessions of fat-burning cardio exercise helps too.

If you’re very overweight, I wouldn’t recommend HITT training, as it might turn you off exercise for good. If you’re a complete newbie to the gym, book a session with a personal trainer.

Hyper-palatable foods

Excess sugar and unhealthy fat equals more belly fat. Start by eliminating any sugary drinks and then focus on enjoying the occasional treat on special occasions, not daily. The natural sugar found in fruit is a good way to satisfy a sugar craving. The fibre and nutrients that fruit contains allows it to be slowly absorbed into the blood stream. Three pieces of fruit is a useful target each day.

Get some shut-eye

Try to get seven to eight hours of sleep per night. Less than that can throw two of your body’s hunger hormones out of balance: leptin and ghrelin. This disruption can cause you to hold onto more fat and crave sugary, salty foods more frequently. Set your alarm for bedtime. Prioritise your sleep. It will help your resilience, both mentally and physically.

The end marks a new beginning

In addition to ending our periods and our ability to conceive, the menopause coincides with the completion of our mothering years. At this life stage, many of us will have independent young sons and daughters carving out careers and fulfilling their dreams. We too have choices to make. We can decide to feel “obsolete” or be determined to find a new “passion”. This doesn’t have to be the two-legged kind – travel, history, poetry, gardening, whatever!

For me, it’s Japan and all things Japanese. I started learning conversational Japanese and planning my travel there. It has taken me two solid years to plan my trip, and my interest is only growing from strength to strength. Find your passion and don’t think it has to have a “save the world” effect. Slow down. Reflect. Go inward. Meditate. What is it you truly enjoy or enjoyed as a younger you?

Paula Mee is a consultant dietitian, paulamee.com.

Pick up this month’s edition of IMAGE magazine to see more.

Also Read

Keith-_-Tara_130_Web Shantanu Starick painting kitchen cabinets
EDITORIAL
How to limit drips and brush strokes while painting kitchen cabinets

Painting kitchen cabinets can be transformative and can be achieved relatively low-cost,...

By Amanda Kavanagh

Rosanna Davidson and her twin boys
premium REAL-LIFE STORIES, PARENTHOOD
Rosanna Davidson: ‘I had sort of accepted that I was a girl who couldn’t have a baby herself’

For Mother's Day Lia Hynes sits down with Rosanna Davidson, whose exceptional journey into motherhood has given many hope.

By Lia Hynes

blank
EDITORIAL
“You’re weird Mammy… other mothers iron”: Author Elske Rahill on writing and motherhood

“Every baby costs you a book” – that’s something women...

By IMAGE

shells cafe
EDITORIAL
A Sligo cottage is transformed into a cool and cosy surfers’ haven

Still one of our favourite homes ever, the easy-breezy interiors...

By IMAGE Interiors & Living

blank
EDITORIAL
MHQ: ‘Before we put more countries on the list, we must know how they will be taken off’

By Amanda Cassidy

Women with MS who take medication, especially immunosuppressants, cannot become pregnant unless they come off medication.
premium HEALTH & WELLNESS, REAL-LIFE STORIES
I had to weigh up the possibility of losing my mind against losing my future children

Holograms of the children she may never have dance across Dearbhla Crosses' mind as an MS diagnosis and Covid-19 are unwelcome reminders of her biological clock ticking.

By Dearbhla Crosse

blank
HEALTH & WELLNESS
The trickle of information from the Government on restrictions has made a grim situation so much worse

By Amanda Cassidy