Sustainable Irish sleepwear brands to help you catch some zs
Sustainable Irish sleepwear brands to help you catch some zs

Sarah Finnan

Andrew McGinley: ‘I cannot forgive the act of murder. I can’t forgive how my children died’
Andrew McGinley: ‘I cannot forgive the act of murder. I can’t forgive how my children...

Amanda Cassidy

What actually consitutes self-care when you’re a mother
What actually consitutes self-care when you’re a mother

Sophie White

The expert guide to your hair problems, from thinning hair to heat damage
The expert guide to your hair problems, from thinning hair to heat damage

Melanie Morris

Best hotel restaurants: 16 places to add to your Irish staycation bucket list
Best hotel restaurants: 16 places to add to your Irish staycation bucket list

Sarah Finnan

Here’s how you can manage symptoms of work anxiety
Here’s how you can manage symptoms of work anxiety

Jennifer McShane

Step straight onto the sand with these 5 Irish hotels on the beach
Step straight onto the sand with these 5 Irish hotels on the beach

Megan Burns

5 inspiring self-help books that will change your life
5 inspiring self-help books that will change your life

Jennifer McShane

Jamie Lee Curtis shows every parent how to handle their child transitioning
Jamie Lee Curtis shows every parent how to handle their child transitioning

Jennifer McShane

Toxic relationships: ‘Why walking away from my mum was the best thing I could have done’
Toxic relationships: ‘Why walking away from my mum was the best thing I could have...

Amanda Cassidy

Image / Editorial

Dear Dad: ‘You’ve taught us a thing or two’


by Molly Fitzpatrick
14th Jun 2018
blank

In honour of Father’s Day this week, we’re celebrating the main men in our lives here at IMAGE HQ. Every day this week, we’ll be sharing a letter penned to our fathers; sharing memories, love and just thanking them for being them. This is a Letter to My Dad.

Dear Dad,

You’ve taught us a thing or two.

You taught us the ingenious creation that is an ice cream float; the magic of fish and chips at the beach and the hours of entertainment you can have with a hose, a sheet of industrial plastic and washing up liquid (known by us as the ‘slippery dip’ long before you could buy a ‘slip and slide’ at the toy shop).

You taught us to be generous, through your own acts of generosity. You are, without a doubt, Santa’s best helper – never failing to leave us lost for words on Christmas morning. Not only with presents we didn’t even dream of receiving, but because you stayed up all night assembling bikes, Sylvanian houses, and even a drum kit you knew you’d have to suffer the consequences of. You were generous with your time; countless lifts into town and home, hours spent trying to teach algebra to a hopeless case and drives to the seaside in ‘the red car’ (a 1970’s Oldsmobile).

You taught us not to take ourselves too seriously. You never minded being the butt of the joke if it made us all laugh. You crack the best dad jokes there are, brushing off the slagging we’d give you for them too. Your quick wit and humour leave even those with whom you had the briefest encounter with a smile across their face.

You taught us to work hard. In fact, I can’t think of anyone I know who works quite as hard as you. Always in your office, driving mom mad when the dinner is ready and getting cold. Spending weeks in the Ivory Coast, Ethiopia and other countries that are far from luxury, only to come back home and turn around and out again a week later. You taught us to love travel, with the stories you’d share over breakfast just off a 14-hour flight. You always made sure we saw the world, with family holidays we’ll never forget. Whether it be to a little old cottage in West Cork, filling the car and trekking out come rain or shine, or a trip for us and mom to New York City.

You taught us to listen; you were always there if we were sad or angry, or even when we were pulling each other’s hair out. You’d listen to us when we just wanted to have a good rant about a teacher who had it in for us, or screech about how annoying sisters are. You’d always offer the most level-headed advice and resolve even the worst of sister feuds.

You taught us to believe in ourselves and that we can do anything big or small. We could suggest any career or mad dream to you and you’d never doubt us for a second. You even believed there was a mathematician in me when I didn’t know my 7 times tables’ aged 17!

Now that I think of it, maybe it wasn’t just a thing or two. Dad, thanks for teaching us everything we know.

Happy Father’s day Jimbo!

Love Molly

Also Read

blank
AGENDA, EDITORIAL
TV presenter Kate Garraway says husband Derek is still “devastated by Covid”

Kate Garraway’s devastating Covid story is a reminder of why we must keep each other in mind as an invisible...

By Jennifer McShane

audiobooks
EDITORIAL
6 brilliant audiobooks worth listening to during lockdown

Six great audiobooks to listen to in lockdown. It took me ages to come around to the idea of audiobooks....

By Jennifer McShane

abgc_architects_aoife_herrity
EDITORIAL
A plain extension in Dublin 8 provides a blank canvas for a design-minded couple

ABGC Architects were enlisted to transform a large white box into a functional living space for two design-minded homeowners. When...

By Amanda Kavanagh

blank
EDITORIAL
‘Quite interesting’: Princess Anne comments on The Crown

We’ve all heard that the royal family don’t exactly gather round to watch The Crown, but one member has shared...

By Jennifer McShane

blank
EDITORIAL
‘In a public health emergency, why does so much of the post-pandemic talk revolve around drinking?’

No other European country is having the same public order challenges our capital city is experiencing, writes Amanda Cassidy I...

By Amanda Cassidy

blank
IMAGE WRITES
The sexist commentary at Wimbledon still remains a problem

Wimbledon in 2021 and once again female athletes are singled out on the playing field, a great deal of the...

By Jennifer McShane

blank
EDITORIAL
The Howth train attack represents a lawlessness that makes me fear for my daughters

I fear the true fallout of Covid on our cities is just getting started, writes Amanda Cassidy As the pandemic...

By Amanda Cassidy