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Dear Dad: ‘You’ve taught us a thing or two’


By Molly Fitzpatrick
14th Jun 2018
Dear Dad: ‘You’ve taught us a thing or two’

In honour of Father’s Day this week, we’re celebrating the main men in our lives here at IMAGE HQ. Every day this week, we’ll be sharing a letter penned to our fathers; sharing memories, love and just thanking them for being them. This is a Letter to My Dad.

Dear Dad,

You’ve taught us a thing or two.

You taught us the ingenious creation that is an ice cream float; the magic of fish and chips at the beach and the hours of entertainment you can have with a hose, a sheet of industrial plastic and washing up liquid (known by us as the ‘slippery dip’ long before you could buy a ‘slip and slide’ at the toy shop).

You taught us to be generous, through your own acts of generosity. You are, without a doubt, Santa’s best helper – never failing to leave us lost for words on Christmas morning. Not only with presents we didn’t even dream of receiving, but because you stayed up all night assembling bikes, Sylvanian houses, and even a drum kit you knew you’d have to suffer the consequences of. You were generous with your time; countless lifts into town and home, hours spent trying to teach algebra to a hopeless case and drives to the seaside in ‘the red car’ (a 1970’s Oldsmobile).

You taught us not to take ourselves too seriously. You never minded being the butt of the joke if it made us all laugh. You crack the best dad jokes there are, brushing off the slagging we’d give you for them too. Your quick wit and humour leave even those with whom you had the briefest encounter with a smile across their face.

You taught us to work hard. In fact, I can’t think of anyone I know who works quite as hard as you. Always in your office, driving mom mad when the dinner is ready and getting cold. Spending weeks in the Ivory Coast, Ethiopia and other countries that are far from luxury, only to come back home and turn around and out again a week later. You taught us to love travel, with the stories you’d share over breakfast just off a 14-hour flight. You always made sure we saw the world, with family holidays we’ll never forget. Whether it be to a little old cottage in West Cork, filling the car and trekking out come rain or shine, or a trip for us and mom to New York City.

You taught us to listen; you were always there if we were sad or angry, or even when we were pulling each other’s hair out. You’d listen to us when we just wanted to have a good rant about a teacher who had it in for us, or screech about how annoying sisters are. You’d always offer the most level-headed advice and resolve even the worst of sister feuds.

You taught us to believe in ourselves and that we can do anything big or small. We could suggest any career or mad dream to you and you’d never doubt us for a second. You even believed there was a mathematician in me when I didn’t know my 7 times tables’ aged 17!

Now that I think of it, maybe it wasn’t just a thing or two. Dad, thanks for teaching us everything we know.

Happy Father’s day Jimbo!

Love Molly