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Victoria Beckham On The “Skinny Model” Debate

Acclaimed fashion designer and businesswoman extraordinaire, Victoria Beckham has come out in defence of the models that worked with her during her show at NYFW. Some critics were quick to deem the participants “skeletal,” but she wanted to publicly say that the women who showcased her SS16 collection were healthy.

“All our girls are healthy,” she told The Telegraph. “Our casting director spoke to the [modelling] agencies, and we know that all our girls are [healthy],” she said.

“They’re young, they’re thin, but that doesn’t mean they’re ill.” The former singer was speaking in response to online backlash (mainly via social media) for using models who were supposedly too slim. The models themselves were also criticised. We’re firm believers of being healthy and happy in your own skin, but Beckham makes a valid point, which is that regardless of their shape, models are regularly subjected to some sort of criticism.

Industry standards are wholly unrealistic; there’s no doubt about it. The pressures woman are placed under to look a certain way or to stay slim, for example, are grossly unfair and vastly unattainable.  But is seems any woman of any size is placed under scrutiny these days. What if a particular model just happens to be naturally slim, for example? What if she finds it almost impossible to gain weight, yet is healthy? Is it fair to subject a thinner model (or any model for that matter) to such ridicule over their shape? Fashion industry critics are in a constant state of flux when it comes to maintaining their standards of the ‘ideal’ body type for women. In this case, models are criticised for being too thin, yet on another occasion, model Gigi Hadid was vilified for her “curvier” shape. It seems women in the fashion industry just can’t win and either way, they are subjected to what appears to be constant body shaming.

Since 2010, Beckham has been an avid supporter of the ‘Healthy is Beauty’ campaign created by the Council of Fashion Designers of America, so it would come as a surprise if she suddenly regained on this. She also frequently insists her clothes are for women of all shapes and sizes and is reportedly working on a “more affordable” fashion line.

Beckham added that said she took on board all criticism but objected to viral attacks online.

“There’s nothing wrong with constructive criticism, and I learn from that and better myself. I’m not expecting anyone to be sycophantic in any way; I never expected that.”

But she maintained there’s a difference between constructive criticism and those who attack others on Twitter.

“People are mean on social media, whoever you are. It’s a shame people have to be that way.”

Perhaps the issue that all “critics” should takeaway here is that while it is always great to promote a healthy body image (we encourage and love to see this), it is also hugely wrong to body shame a woman because of her shape, be it slim or otherwise.

Via The Telegraph

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