Gourmet Irish Getaways: Part One

Ireland's reputation as a gastronomic haven is well-deserved, as?the?Image Interiors & Living?team discovered following several recent jaunts around the country. In the first part of our series, we visit Waterford, Galway and Cork...?

THE CLIFF HOUSE HOTEL, WATERFORD

Cliff House Hotel Terrace

THE LOWDOWN

One of the world's most beautiful cliff-top hotels, Waterford's Cliff House Hotel is worth the trip for the panoramic views across the picturesque Ardmore Bay alone. This five-star, 39-room boutique retreat'sports an intimate destination spa with a variety of treatments and a Michelin-starred restaurant packed full of delectable dining options.

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FOOD & DRINK?

The House Restaurant is overseen by?award-winning chef?Martijn Kajuiter, whose tantalising tasting dinner menu boasts a particularly special starter collection of West Cork scallops, albacore tuna?and duck foie gras. Main courses include Bantry Bay organic salmon with pickled vegetables, herbs and maple smoke, Helvick turbot accompanied by Lismore chanterelles, pistachio, bee pollen and line seeds, and a Skeaghanore duck dish complimented by chervil roots, garden kale and Vadouvan spices.

The dessert collection is alluringly exotic.?Think organic chocolate, local blackberries and?parfait nougatine with hibiscus, rhubarb and popcorn. The tasting menu costs €95 per person and requires the participation of the entire table.

HIGHLIGHTS

Our spacious self-catering house located just above the main hotel, the Cliff Cottage instantly felt like a home away from home and offered incredible vistas from every front-facing window. On nice evenings, the veranda of the seafront bar is the perfect place to sip raspberry and mint cocktails, while taking in the sights and sounds of the beach below.

 

THE TWELVE HOTEL, GALWAY

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Twelve Hotel West Restaurant

THE LOWDOWN

Don't be deceived: Barna may be small, but it has plenty of eatery options - from the hearty seafood chowder in Donnelly's pub to a slice of Italy at Pizza Dozzina. Pick of the bunch, however, is the West Restaurant, found on the first floor of the?Twelve Hotel.

FOOD & DRINK?

After a day spent hiking and paddling through this charming Connemara-set village, Upstairs @ West Restaurant is a terrific spot for rest, relaxation and ridiculously good eats. Warm sourdough bread coupled with a side of hay oil prompts the unique feeling?of an Irish summer. A feather-light amuse-bouche of salmon mousse with salmon caviar and samphire was then beautifully presented on a glass box.

A starter of Thornhill duck heart and raviolo and foie gras was accompanied by?a flavourful consomm? and hearty wild mushrooms. That's merely to name but three but there's a high level of originality found across the entire menu, particularly when you get to dessert.

HIGHLIGHTS

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Opt for chocolate ganache with beetroot confit, whiskey caviar and a walnut crumb for?earthy and rich sensations. ?A glass of vintage port or'muscat provides?the perfect finish.

 

LONGUEVILLE HOUSE HOTEL, CORK

Longueville-House-Hotel

THE LOWDOWN

A vegan-friendly haven, Longueville House?is an 18th century Georgian country house nestled in the heart of a hidden 500-acre wooded estate and every bit as resplendent as that sounds. Open log fires, antique family collections and fresh garden flowers add to a warm, natural atmosphere.

FOOD & DRINK?

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Longueville House's?owner and chef, William O'Callaghan, trained under Raymond Blanc at Le Manoir aux Quat?Saisons of Oxford and so his?cookery skills are a force to be reckoned with. Enjoy an inventive meal by a roaring fire such as a seven-course tasting menu consisting of canap's, fresh beetroot, carrot and homemade vinaigrette and sundried tomato and pesto on toast. Delicately-fried courgettes stuffed with pearl barley, granita sorbets and lentil-filled samosas with roasted vegetables satisfy even the most sensitive of palates.

HIGHLIGHTS

Pressed from their 25-acre apple orchard, Longueville's own brand of cider goes down a treat, while a mint-seasoned berries and sorbet dessert makes for a light end to a delicious dining experience.

Featured image: William O'Callaghan of Longueville House

READ?GOURMET IRISH GETAWAYS: PART ONE HERE

READ?GOURMET IRISH GETAWAYS: PART THREE HERE

 

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