Burberry Names Riccardo Tisci As Its New Chief Creative Officer

It has been announced that Riccardo Tisci - formerly of Nike and Givenchy - will take the lead as Christopher Bailey's successor at Burberry. Christopher Bailey stepped down in October 2017 after 17 years as creative lead at the British heritage brand.

The news might come as a surprise giving the stark contrast between Givenchy and Burberry, but Tisci has been credited with resurrecting the LVMH-owned couture house with his dark, sensual and subversive collections. Tisci left Givenchy on good terms in January after his contract with the house came to an end.

According to Business of Fashion, Tisci's new role at Burberry will see him direct all of the Burberry collections and present his first for the brand this coming September.

 

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Tisci is one of few designers who has successfully blended popular streetwear with high fashion with staggering commercial value. While at Givenchy, he transformed the label into one of the most-desired labels at Paris Fashion Week, gaining even more momentum for the brand in doing so. His work has helped to spearhead the creation of an entirely new fashion subculture and market which continues to drive-forward the need for fresh and innovative design.

It's unclear what the future of Berberry will look like - especially after a mammoth 17-year relationship with Bailey – but change is imminent. Given Tisci's affinity with luxe athleisure and love of striking silhouettes, perhaps we'll see Tisci take the brand in a new and contemporary direction and re-energise the whole Burberry aesthetic.

In the late 90s, Tisci left his hometown of Taranto in southern Italy to study at Central Saint Martins in London, graduating in 1999. In September 2004, he set up an eponymous ready-to-wear label, showing his first collection in Milan for the Autumn/Winter 2005 season. The show caught the attention of Marco Gobetti – Burberry’s chief executive – who hired Tisci to replace Julien MacDonald as creative director of Givenchy in February 2005.

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