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Image / Editorial

More Proof That Low-Fat Milk Isn’t All That Good For You


by Jennifer McShane
05th Apr 2016
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For years, those dieting and on respective health kicks have been told to favour slimline products over their full-fat counterparts. However, the research keeps mounting that calls this into question. Statistics say that full-fat dairy products are not only healthier, but they may also be less fattening than the low-fat options. The issue, like many dietary concerns today, comes down to sugar or carbohydrates and their impact on health.

A new study, published in Circulation, looks at the blood work from the 3,333 adults who participated in the follow-up study covering about 15 years and the Nurses? Health Study of Health Professionals. The research team found that study participants who had higher levels of three full-fat dairy byproducts in their bloodstream had a lower risk of getting diabetes during the study than those who consumed low-fat dairy products. The people who favoured full-fat dairy had an average 46% lower risk of diabetes than those opting for skim or low-fat products.

Full-fat dairy items have more calories, but reducing fat content often led people to increase their sugar and carb intake. That increased their risk of diabetes.

A separate study, published in February in the American Journal of Nutrition, looked at the effects low-fat dairy versus full-fat dairy had on obesity. That research effort involved more than 18,000 females who participated in the Women’s Health Study. The study showed that people who consumed more high-fat dairy actually lowered their risk of being obese or overweight by 8%.

So, there you go. Don’t feel guilty for including the full-fat milk option in your lunchtime coffee. It’s really rather good for you.

Via Time