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Allergy Sufferers, This Device Could Change Your Life


By Jennifer McShane
03rd Jun 2016
Allergy Sufferers, This Device Could Change Your Life

For those that suffer from gluten,’dairy or peanut allergies, dining out can be tricky and if the right care is not taken, dangerous. Despite the barrage of gluten-free menus available in restaurants these days, some are hesitant when it comes to using these and of course, you can’t always tell what’s in your food just by looking at it. However, a new device is about to land on US shores that could change all that.

The Nima device was developed by a pairing based in San Francisco (who are both gluten-free) to make dining out socially easier and safer for those watching what they eat as an aid to those with sensitivities and allergies peanuts and milk.

According?to Wallpaper, Shireen Yates, co-founder and CEO of Nima, had her “aha?’moment” when a waitress asked her “how gluten allergic” she really was. “I had never had issues with food and, in college, I found out I had all these problems with gluten, eggs, dairy, and soy. I couldn’t eat anything.” She aims to give diners peace of mind while eating.

Nima is a portable, chemistry-based sensor that uses the proteins in the food to detect if the avoidable ingredient is present. To get a reading, users drop a sample of the food or drink into the device’s disposable capsule; within roughly two minutes they get their results. If the food has gluten in it, a frown face will appear on the sensor. If it is gluten free, a smiley face appears. Users can share the results using an accompanying app to help other users with food allergies.

In its first stages, the Nima will sell designated capsules for each specific allergy – gluten, peanut, or milk – but the company?eventually hopes to create a single capsule that can test for any ingredient the consumer hopes to avoid, and thus, make the dining out experience worry-free for allergy suffers.

Find out more about the product here

Via Wallpaper